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  • Trials
    replied
    Going riding today
    in the woods, not too many coronaviruses roaming around out in the woods yet.
    I feel badly for city people, I couldn't even imagine what it would be like to live in a hi-rise apartment building now.

    Leave a comment:


  • WoodstockJeff
    replied
    Today, our governor activated the Emergency Broadcast System to tell us citizens that the new COVID emergency procedures are in place, and that, among other things, we should "celebrate the upcoming holidays virtually".

    I guess that means we stay home and send each other pictures of the dishes we might have made if there was someone coming over to eat them...

    Leave a comment:


  • WoodstockJeff
    replied
    If you ride on your head, everything will shake back to where it was. Net effect should be zero, assuming you don't crash while on your head.

    The class covered M->F, F->M, M->M, and F->F, as well as saying just about anything to someone with their own personal opinion of their true gender. Including that the previous sentence could be deemed to be sexual harassment towards that last group.

    Watching "live" TV in the era (error?) of Social Distancing is painful at best. It reminds me of every Zoom/Skype/Webex/whatever video conferencing call I've been on, and not in a good way. You really can't tell what's going on, you're distracted by the jerky video, and the participants have no clue how good or bad their audio is, or even where the microphone is so they can direct their voice toward it. Or they try to do it with a phone-based "selfie cam", so their backgrounds are spinning randomly as the all-important "them" is centered.

    Leave a comment:


  • Trials
    replied
    Sexual harassment lol I could help you fail that one fast, I was one of only 4 males working in an organization with over 200 nurses, almost all female right up to the CEO, it was awesome, I was always being sexually harassed. :I lived in a good time.

    Rode all day today, it hurts everywhere, going riding all day tomorrow and see if I can fix that

    Leave a comment:


  • WoodstockJeff
    replied
    Had to take an online Sexual Harassment training class as part of being employed by the college. In it, they said that the only person-to-person contact that was really acceptable in the work place was a handshake; anything else could be considered harassment by the other party. Ooops, COVID is taking that last safe haven of the touchy-feely crowd away.

    While researching what the latest batch of restrictions being imposed by our governor, I found information about what they're going through in Michigan - if you don't sell something on the approved list of "emergency supplies", you're not allowed to open your store. If you do sell those things, you have to cordon off any part of your store that has non-approved items in it.

    Is that an admission that they don't think "social distancing" is enough? Do they want to punish people for doing things like home repair, gardening, or reading books they didn't own before cower-in-place order was imposed?

    It seems counter-intuitive, from from the standpoint of keeping the populace under control, to deny them access to the things they need to distract themselves. Not to mention that it's driving them to online vendors of non-approved stuff. This reduces tax revenue to local governments (the state has ensured that they get THEIR share of online sales taxes), and making it less likely that the local businesses will recover when things "settle down".

    Maybe they just want to help Amazon sell more of their "Can't Realize A Profit" items?

    Leave a comment:


  • WoodstockJeff
    replied
    What I see is similar to other "just discovered" diseases - as you test more people, you see more cases. I would venture to say that, right now, only a few percentage points of the population of the world has been tested for COVID19. As the percentage increases, so do the number of positive cases.

    The spread of COVID hasn't been as steep a ramp as the graphs depict. And the number of undetected cases is probably great, too. Few people get tested unless they suspect that they're infected. And just because you test negative today, does not mean that you'll stay negative. The numbers given out in various places of "70% exposure" are likely to happen, over the next couple of years. A lot will depend on how close we live to transportation hubs, where it will continue to spread over time, and how much we and our friends travel.

    Probably, once they start including COVID in our annual flu shots, we might "all" test positive for it.

    Leave a comment:


  • Trials
    replied
    Originally posted by WoodstockJeff View Post
    There are a lot of factors. ...
    The concerning factor I see right now is a US attrition rate surpassing the rest of the world by a huge factor and that indicates you guys have a huge problem on your hands, but from a national perspective y'all seem to want to trivialize the danger by calling it just another flu with a slight chance of fatality.

    Leave a comment:


  • Trials
    replied
    um, a third of the worlds population has TB in them,
    source: https://theconversation.com/tubercul...-stop-it-56645

    IMHO the biggest difference between TB and Corona virus is TB is shaped like a worm and Corona is shaped like a bur.

    Leave a comment:


  • WoodstockJeff
    replied
    Ah, TB... One of the stories on the lockdown in the Philippines was about a family of 5, 4 of which have TB and cannot get access to their medications, because they're not allowed to travel to the doctor. If they had COVID, they'd be all but dragged out of their home to be quarantined in a medical facility, but they don't, so they're quarantined at home, where they'll probably die.

    But not of COVID-19!

    I said elsewhere that lockdowns are the perfect political solution...

    If people die in spite of them, it was because "local officials did not enforce it enough."

    If people survive in spite of them, it was because "we moved quickly, so don't argue next time we impose one."

    If people are found dead in their homes because they obeyed and didn't go out to get food or medicine, it's because "we need to improve our social welfare system, so don't complain when we boost your taxes."

    Leave a comment:


  • Trials
    replied
    Phew good, then I don't need to worry about it any more then I worry about tuberculosis.

    Leave a comment:


  • WoodstockJeff
    replied
    There are a lot of factors.

    Our city has had 9 deaths in the last week attributed to COVID. 5 were in a nursing facility with 12 total patients and 14 staff. 4 were in an "assisted living facility", where there are now nearly 40 staff that tested positive.

    A friend is moving to Tennessee. He called the local health department to ask about the 8 reported deaths in the county down there. All were in nursing homes.

    There are people who are more susceptible to what this virus can do. I fall in two of the groups that tend to die from it more than others, but that means I have a 3 or 4% chance of dying if I get it, instead of a fraction of a percent. When I had pneumonia a few years back, I was told I was in a 5% mortality group. So, I keep way from sick people and self monitor rather frequently.

    What people don't think about is that COVID deaths are about the same level, and affect the same groups, as your average influenza strain. But there's a face to put on this particular one, though - the puffer ball picture. There are tests to isolate this particular one. There is international blame to apply to [insert politician name here] for this particular one.

    The old SARS is still around. So is Swine Flu and Bird Flu. They still kill people. But, if someone caught any of them right now, absent taking a specific test to isolate, they'd all be counted as COVID infections, since the classification criteria is "flu-like symptoms".

    Leave a comment:


  • Trials
    replied
    Originally posted by Sorg67 View Post
    I was in Canada in March for a ski trip. Had to cut the trip short since we were worried the airports might close and we would be stuck there.

    I had been at a remote lodge with no TV following the news on the internet. Quite different to see the news on TV. I flew out of Calgary and spent the night there before my flight. There was a report on Canadian TV of a woman who returned to Canada from India while not feeling well. She complained that "nobody stopped her", "nobody took her temperature". What about some personal responsibility?

    As we reopen economies, we will have to expect people to use some common sense and take some personal responsibility. So far it seems people are behaving well enough in the US. But I wonder how long that can last and how much common sense we can expect as thing loosen up.

    No matter how we ease restrictions, people are going to die. We will have to accept some loss of life in balance with moving on with life. That is going to be a difficult conversation to have. Even though we accept loss of life in balance with life all the time. People do not like to admit it, but it is necessary for society to function.
    Just seen todays death toll, what the heck are you guys doing down there!
    4928 dead in a 24 hour period is not business as usual.

    Leave a comment:


  • Trials
    replied
    It's a world wide problem for sure.

    Leave a comment:


  • Sorg67
    replied
    I was in Canada in March for a ski trip. Had to cut the trip short since we were worried the airports might close and we would be stuck there.

    I had been at a remote lodge with no TV following the news on the internet. Quite different to see the news on TV. I flew out of Calgary and spent the night there before my flight. There was a report on Canadian TV of a woman who returned to Canada from India while not feeling well. She complained that "nobody stopped her", "nobody took her temperature". What about some personal responsibility?

    As we reopen economies, we will have to expect people to use some common sense and take some personal responsibility. So far it seems people are behaving well enough in the US. But I wonder how long that can last and how much common sense we can expect as thing loosen up.

    No matter how we ease restrictions, people are going to die. We will have to accept some loss of life in balance with moving on with life. That is going to be a difficult conversation to have. Even though we accept loss of life in balance with life all the time. People do not like to admit it, but it is necessary for society to function.

    Leave a comment:


  • Trials
    replied
    Fella on another forum is a Canadian stuck in Mumbai
    If cops don't want you hanging around on the street there, they lay a beating on you or make you do pushups and deep knee bends,
    lol and then probably beat on you with sticks some more.

    Leave a comment:

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