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Mid to Late 90s Dynas

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  • #16
    Pass thanks, I still kinda like it up here. I traveled Arizona you guys buy your fish at the market, I catch mine out of my Lake in the front yard and if I need firewood or lumber, I cut down some Trees because we have too darn many of them anyway. Our winter does get a bit severe though Have you ever opened your fuel tank and looked inside to see the thick layer of horror frost inside the tank? condensation ... one of the reasons we have to keep our fuel tanks topped up throughout most of the winter. Right now our fuel prices are going up because they just made the switch from Winter fuel to Summer fuel. you guys probably don't even know what winter fuel is, <- that is where they dilute the gasoline with alcohols so that it can absorb water and then they sell us watered down fuel at outrageous fuel prices

    Looks like maybe no rain or snow here today that makes today pretty special for April I get to go riding today without having to wear gortex.

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    • #17
      Originally posted by OBX-RIDER View Post
      I dunno .. it was pretty dang wet in Arizona this past Winter ..
      This past winter was pretty typical...of the way that winters were about 30 years ago.

      Seriously though, when I lived in Iowa (late 70s through mid 80s) I had no problems with gasohol. Even in my 20+ year old car and 10+ year old motorcycles. Fuel lines did not dissolve, gaskets did not become fragile, diaphragms did not crack. Starting in severe cold, lower than -10F, was trickier.

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      • #18
        So, here is what I am gathering.... the gasohol shouldn't be a big deal, provided the carbs are tuned for it, and I follow proper winterization procedures/don't let gas age/sit for extended periods. Based on the photo, …. I'm guessing a regular prophylactic carb cleaning would be a good idea.

        I still wonder why the gasohol was listed as a reason for selling the carbed EVO in Norty's post, if regular maintenance is all that's required to combat the effects. Maybe it was the drop in mileage per tank and not the other possible effects we've been discussing.

        Also, this brings up another maintenance issue that has been on my mind. Am considering taking the 650 in to the dealership for a full servicing. When is the best time to do a full cleaning, syncing, & carb tuning. I assume the cleaning and syncing could be pretty much anytime, weather/temps not being an issue. But what about adjustments? I'll usually ride when morning Temps are 50F or higher and I think I can avoid heavy rain. But temps reach well above 100F regularly here, mid to late summer. Should those carbs be re-tuned then, or wait until it's somewhere in between, say 80ish.... or does it really matter much.

        I understand the Fuel injection does have an advantage over carbs in this regard, as they attempt to adjust. I however am currently riding a dual carb bike, and shopping for a carbed one as well.

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        • #19
          "prophylactic carb cleaning" I like that.
          Likely depends on the bike and the climate you are operating in, for me when I was still running carburetor equipped bikes (lol 15+ years ago) they were 2-stroke engines and I found I had to adjust the carb main jet needle by 1 notch for the hotter/dryer summer months, spring and fall needed the same setting and it's no big deal when you can do it yourself. I'm sure some motors are way more sensitive to climate and elevation changes then others ymmv.


          1970's and 80's :/ we were still running leaded gasoline! I never had problems back then either, but now-a-days regular unleaded pump fuel has a shelf life much closer to milk! Have to tell you this story: I had a truck universal joint seize up when I was traveling through DeMoines Iowa years ago, I pulled the drive shaft in the parking lot of the local Ford dealership, sat it on the parts counter and the guy said 'what do you want us to do with that thing?' They had a great laugh at how rusty it was and when I told him how new it actually was, he said 'you must come from some place really humid, we have old wrecked cars left out in the corn fields with less rust on them then that' They fixed me up good and got me on my way after they cut the bolts off with a cutting torch.

          Oklahoma, I don't think you will have anywhere near the humidity problems we see up here and you won't normally see the elevation changes that Norty would be riding in California or the riders in places like Colorado. Modern fuel injection does a great job of self adjusting for elevation changes too

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          • #20
            Originally posted by CountofQ View Post
            From a non-mechanic, what does the alcohol content have to due with the carb? I thought the changes in fuel affected pistons? Anyway... enlighten me to the problems of our changing fuels and the EVO, please.
            trials covered this for you.

            So for cruising the freeways & turnpikes around 80-85 mph (Oklahoma is raising speed limits), your vote would be YES? There is a lot of discussion on the HDForums about how much the EVO vibrates around those speeds. A "rumbling freight train" is a term that has popped up in threads a few times. Many there recommend moving up to a touring model. What's your take? I'm talking EVO era dynas, specifically.
            The EVO is certainly capable of those speeds (and much higher.) Figure you'll be turning 3000 rpm @ 72mph. The EVO in that era's Touring bikes are the same as the Dyna line. (Bear in mind the Ultra got fuel injection starting with the 1994 MY.) Both frame families get rubber mounted engines, so that's the same. Gear ratio's are the same (I think.) So, as far as "vibration" is concerned, they're going to be similar to each other. The Touring bikes may be slightly less as they scale 175lbs more than the Dyna's.
            The biggest difference in the 2 frame families during those years seems to be... (other than weight~)
            The Dyna gives the sense that you're sitting "IN" the bike. This exudes confidence.
            The touring bikes give the sense that you're sitting "ON TOP" of the bike. This feels like you're sitting on a fence, on the brink of teetering and falling off. This strips away confidence. (I had a 1996 RoadKing (Fuelie) that I had for 5 years) Along with my Dyna FXD. Didn't ride it much because of the aforementioned sense, and it was just too cantankerous for city/short hop work. Great for "over-the-road" touring though. The Dyna was the opposite. Great for "point-n-shoot" city work, but kinda lacking in the "accoutrements" that make touring a nicer experience.
            Harley usually goes to new technology with their "top-of-the-line" bikes first, then the tech trickles down to the lower frame families.

            One thing I might warn you about...The HD touring bikes are not really set-up for "high speed work." Their suspensions/frame geometry and frame flex my contribute to "Death wobble" at the speeds you're looking at in OK. The Dyna bikes don't seem to have this problem. Harley builds the touring bikes to be good for 55-60mph, and not much more. Sure, they'll go faster (with a tail wind, lol) but again, the handling may get risky if/when you approach the ton.
            Since you are used to the handling quirks of the V-Star 6-fiddy, the HD should likely steer more "neutral" meaning you shouldn't have to continue pressing on the inside bar to continue your lean (as long as you don't change the lean angle nor velocity.) I found this on the 6-fiddy I put 10,000 miles on, many years ago. Good bike but runs outs breath at about 55mph. Engine strains above this speed compared to the "lazy potato-potato-potato" of the HD EVO.
            (Hey, anyone heard from "Ms. Potatohead?")
            The other thing you might consider is being able to pack stuff on your bike. The mid 90's Dyna might be hard to find obsolete bags/trunks. The touring bikes already have saddle bags and w'screens.
            Best thing I can say is find someone close by that has what you're considering and see if they'll trade with you for 75-100 miles. Or, you might find an owner that rents older Dyna's here~ www.twistedroads.com
            Good luck with your hunt!
            Last edited by NORTY; 04-26-2019, 08:40 PM. Reason: goofed up
            Knowledge speaks, wisdom listens.

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            • #21
              Originally posted by CountofQ View Post

              I still wonder why the gasohol was listed as a reason for selling the carbed EVO in Norty's post, if regular maintenance is all that's required to combat the effects. Maybe it was the drop in mileage per tank and not the other possible effects we've been discussing.
              The carb was just one factor. The other was that I've had that bike for over 20 years, and was "ready for a change." The bike was awesome, overall. Now, about that carb. The jet needle tip would erode fairly quickly in the presence of ethanol laden gasoline, and air/oxygen. This causes drivability problems such as reduced efficiency. A drop in mileage isn't a huge hit costwise, but when calculating range, it can become an issue when riding the wide open spaces known as the desert SouthWest. Not unusual to ride 100 miles in one direction with the hopes of the only gas station in town not being closed/out of gas. The Dyna got 34mpg. The heavier (slightly more powerful) Roadking got 50mpg. Even 2-up. That's just one of the differences between carbs and fuel injection. Trials listed other differences.
              Another nice thing about Harleys is that they have hydraulic valve lifters. While these don't offer ultra high rpm, they also don't require the maintenance of valve lash adjusting. This single service has become a cash cow for dealerships that service bikes that need their valves checked/adjusted every 6000/7500 mlles (Yamaha is >20,000 miles on some of their bikes.) For some, this service can run $1000. That's a lot of dough if you ride 15,000 mi. per year.

              Also, this brings up another maintenance issue that has been on my mind. Am considering taking the 650 in to the dealership for a full servicing. When is the best time to do a full cleaning, syncing, & carb tuning. I assume the cleaning and syncing could be pretty much anytime, weather/temps not being an issue. But what about adjustments? I'll usually ride when morning Temps are 50F or higher and I think I can avoid heavy rain. But temps reach well above 100F regularly here, mid to late summer. Should those carbs be re-tuned then, or wait until it's somewhere in between, say 80ish.... or does it really matter much.

              I understand the Fuel injection does have an advantage over carbs in this regard, as they attempt to adjust. I however am currently riding a dual carb bike, and shopping for a carbed one as well.
              Knowledge speaks, wisdom listens.

              Comment


              • #22
                Here are jet needles from my FXD. One is unusually worn, and the other has 12-15,000 miles on it. (The worn needle does have >100,000 miles.) But, it should never have worn...



                I don't recall seeing that quartet of carbs (courtesy of Atomic Alex,) but that main jet on the left carb is absolutely horrible!
                Last edited by NORTY; 05-11-2020, 05:07 PM. Reason: added value!
                Knowledge speaks, wisdom listens.

                Comment


                • #23
                  Found the setting on my iphone for a better pic...



                  Ok, that's worse. Oh well, look at that erosion.
                  Last edited by NORTY; 05-11-2020, 05:23 PM. Reason: ugh
                  Knowledge speaks, wisdom listens.

                  Comment


                  • #24
                    That's incredible, is it from cavitation or vibration impact?

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