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BRC weekend in MI - freezing my bearings off!

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  • #16
    Yeah, exactly, Margaret! I was taught one-on-one. It's a big difference!

    My comments from the range....

    The RCs are fantastic. Up and down professional, communicative, and empathetic. I mean that they quickly find the best way to get peple to move how is needed. I also really like how the exercises flow into one another.
    I could not powerwalk to save my life. I could skim one foot, but my brain said moving equals feet up.
    Both RCs for my group of eight - there are about sixty total in the class broken into A and B range groups, which are further broken into three groups of ten each each - identified quickly that I could ride and Spoke to me about it on the side. I told them that I was here to learn how to ride in the US and as I was trained in Germany, I was sure at I had a lot to unlearn. Biggest issues for me are downshifting at stops and putting my left foot down first. In Germany, we stop first, then shift to neutral, and the right foot is down first. Then we bangshift our noisy Beemers into first when the light turns green. I am managing those topics wellbut if I get distracted at any point, my German training takes over.
    The box is way bigger than I thought. I was doing the box drill on the CBR in four spaces after lots of practice. This is considerably roomier and therefore not so much of an issue as I expected. aS we only have to uturn left in DE, the whole turning right thing still sometimes escapes me. But overall no serious issues. I had a foot off one peg on the right turn of one of six box runs. Not on the ground, just kind of outriggering.
    The TU250Xs are great!! Just like the Kawi EL252 I started on. My arms are a bit straighter than I'd like, so I was tucking down for some drills. That helped.
    Speaking of which, they arre so little and light that I cannot feel any pressure on the bars at all in turning. After hauling the GS around so much and having that track day, I know what it means to push on the bars. This was like just thinking about it. I rarely had enough speed to really execute what I would consider a proper full-on countersteer. But for those who haven't ridden a bigger bike or at higher speeds, I can see that this is a nice exercise and helps them face the facts in a hurry. The exercise is well-designed, IMO.
    We had no falls in my group. Everyone seems quite sereious to learn and ride well. This is nice as the RCs seem to have plenty of time to work through things and speak with us.
    The group before us lost a husband and wife after the first range session. No idea what happened, but it was noted that they were not expected back.
    No one in my group seemed to be able to remember the acronyms.

    One thing I thought of during the day was that for my $25, at the bare minimum, I'm getting a weekend of coached PLP. That is pretty good!

    I am really impressed with the RCs that are assigned to my group. They clearly love riding, to the point that I think the I-have-a-Harley-on-layaway guys didn't seem to really understand some of the passion they have. Several times, they commented on how happy I was. I said, dude, I'm on a bike! How can you have a bad day on a bike? And it's this cute little thing that just goes by itself. This is fun!

    My group has five DOT brain buckets, two with HD logos, one no-name modular, one Icon Airmada, and me. The Icon guy has an Icon jacket. I was so overdressed, it wasn't even funny. I did see a pair of high-vis gloves on a guy in anoher group, but I was the only person with so little shame as to be in a vest. I even wore one that was kind of clean. Quite a few other groups had people with chaps and leather jackets. At one point it occurred to me that my hemet cost more than all of the other gear in my group. I don't mean that as a dig, I mean it as wow, I apparently take this pretty seriously now. I'm so used to being in Germany where everyone takes everything superserious that it is kind of different here.

    I was happy to do good quick stops with no front brake issues. I have no idea why you guys think these brakes are touchy! :-p You just squeeze and the bike stops......

    So... Day 1 under the belt. Tons of fun. Taken from the coached PLP persective, I think this is actually far more useful than it is made out to be.
    Katherine goes to Fahrschule - the German rider training thread :: Nine Days in the Alps :: BRC 2014 :: Finding GS Land
    2012 CBR250R (sold), 2001 Super Sherpa, 2004 BMW F650GSa - not a big Ford truck...

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    • #17
      We were also taught in my BRC to downshift while slowing, then putting only the left foot down while keeping the right foot on the brake. This means we're ready to move in case of emergency, and we don't need the front brake while stopped so we have the option of being quick on the throttle in an emergency. My rider coaches actually went so far as to say that you can spot untrained riders because they don't put the left foot down first/only. I wonder why they would do it differently in Deutschland.

      via my nerded out Nexus 5
      Tim
      2011 Triumph Sprint GT
      vroom

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      • #18
        Originally posted by atomicalex View Post
        I was happy to do good quick stops with no front brake issues. I have no idea why you guys think these brakes are touchy! :-p You just squeeze and the bike stops......
        The first year we had TU250s in our program, they were on a different range. They moved them to the range that I usually work the second year. On my first class of that year, I was playing with the TU quite a bit on breaks, and then proceed to use it to demonstrate quick stops...

        Um, well... stoppies 10 feet in front of the students is generally considered bad form for a demo... Which is why it is never a good idea to make your first quick stop on a particular motorcycle with an audience...
        Jeff

        "Remember when being socially distant was a symptom of a potentially debilitating mental disorder, instead of a government mandate? C'mon, it was just a few weeks ago!"

        "Modern Liberalism: The embodiment of an irrational fear of letting other people run their own lives."

        '13 XT250
        '10 ZG-1400 (operational again)

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        • #19
          Originally posted by mz33 View Post
          ...Covering the brake impedes learning to manipulate the throttle, and in fact, can be very dangerous for a novice...
          At's because you guys teach them to use all of their fingers to brake, so covering the brake would mean riding with an open hand.


          "I could not powerwalk to save my life" powerwalk ?:I …tell me that doesn't mean what I think it is or I just lost all respect for the BRC

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          • #20
            Trials, for the people who have never sat on a bike, it is a good thing. I did it in Germany a bit, not as much as in teh BRC, but also i was being walked along by my instructor. Even here, you spen a whole five mnutes on it. Just enough to get the friction zone found reliably.
            Katherine goes to Fahrschule - the German rider training thread :: Nine Days in the Alps :: BRC 2014 :: Finding GS Land
            2012 CBR250R (sold), 2001 Super Sherpa, 2004 BMW F650GSa - not a big Ford truck...

            Comment


            • #21
              Power walk - used as a transition from static motorcycle exercises to riding. Also used when students are maneuvering in close proximity to each other during early riding.

              It is not a good idea to have 12 people who have never been on a motorcycle trying to get their feet up on the pegs at the same time they're trying to learn how a clutch operates.
              Jeff

              "Remember when being socially distant was a symptom of a potentially debilitating mental disorder, instead of a government mandate? C'mon, it was just a few weeks ago!"

              "Modern Liberalism: The embodiment of an irrational fear of letting other people run their own lives."

              '13 XT250
              '10 ZG-1400 (operational again)

              Comment


              • #22
                rEgarding the left/right foot, I am not sure. I think it is probably due to there being relatively few low speed collisions in Germany. Also it is the rule in England, where you pull up the parki brake in a car at every stop.
                Katherine goes to Fahrschule - the German rider training thread :: Nine Days in the Alps :: BRC 2014 :: Finding GS Land
                2012 CBR250R (sold), 2001 Super Sherpa, 2004 BMW F650GSa - not a big Ford truck...

                Comment


                • #23
                  Originally posted by atomicalex View Post
                  Trials, for the people who have never sat on a bike, it is a good thing. I did it in Germany a bit, not as much as in teh BRC, but also i was being walked along by my instructor. Even here, you spen a whole five mnutes on it. Just enough to get the friction zone found reliably.
                  k, it's not what I thought it was I pictured the whole class being taught to duck walk

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                  • #24
                    Originally posted by Trials View Post
                    k, it's not what I thought it was I pictured the whole class being taught to duck walk
                    They do before power walking.Then we have them rock back and forth, heel to toe, before actually power-walking. Finally, they learn how to duck walk under power, using juuuust enough clutch/throttle to pull the bike along.

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                    • #25
                      I was thinking about learning to drive my granddad's Ford pickup and my aunt yelling at me to 'give it more gas'. I discovered myself that it had almost nothing to do with 'gas' and everything to do with 'clutch'. I was about 10 and I had several acres before I could hit anything expensive. I remembered that a few years later when I rode a Triumph Tiger (the 1969 version) for the first time when it's owner was too drunk to ride his bike home from the club ... he drove my Mustang while I rode his bike ...

                      High dollar schools like Rawhyde Adventure's Offroad Clinic really emphasize knowing and utilizing the friction zone and I think it would be hard to over-emphasize it. I found myself out of spit nearing the top of a long steep dirt/rock hill today, squeezed the clutch enough to load up some revs and e-a-s-e-d the clutch out maintaining traction and topping the hill. Maybe I put some wear on the clutch but I did not slide backwards into hoards of Cholla Jumping cactus ...
                      The best thing you can buy for your motorcycle is gas.

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                      • #26
                        Sounds like fun Alex, are you taking the BRC to get your M now that you are back here in the states?

                        Gerry
                        Peace ~ Love Ride ~ Then Ride Some More
                        '16 Kawasaki Vulcan S 650 with ABS - "ED-2ND" - Special in a new way.
                        '05 Yamaha 1100 V* Silverado "Beast, Big Ass Bike" - The name said it all.
                        '02 Suzuki 650 Savage - "Special Ed' - A wonderful memory.
                        - Gerry -

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                        • #27
                          I hope you bundled up today! Maybe the sun will make it feel like it's over 30° out there.

                          via my nerded out Nexus 5
                          Tim
                          2011 Triumph Sprint GT
                          vroom

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                          • #28
                            Passed skills... one point for being 0.02s slow in the turn at speed. The RCs noted this.
                            Katherine goes to Fahrschule - the German rider training thread :: Nine Days in the Alps :: BRC 2014 :: Finding GS Land
                            2012 CBR250R (sold), 2001 Super Sherpa, 2004 BMW F650GSa - not a big Ford truck...

                            Comment


                            • #29
                              Did you do the written test there as well, or do you need to do that at the SoS? Or does your German endorsement transfer?

                              via my nerded out Nexus 5
                              Tim
                              2011 Triumph Sprint GT
                              vroom

                              Comment


                              • #30
                                Missed one on the written about braking....
                                Katherine goes to Fahrschule - the German rider training thread :: Nine Days in the Alps :: BRC 2014 :: Finding GS Land
                                2012 CBR250R (sold), 2001 Super Sherpa, 2004 BMW F650GSa - not a big Ford truck...

                                Comment

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