Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

The German Rider Training thread

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • SoCal LabRat
    replied
    I agree with you about the cancel signal location. It's awkward. I have had my bike for 2 years and just now am getting mostly comfortable with it.

    Otherwise I love everything about it! Except the stock seat.

    Leave a comment:


  • psitzmary
    replied
    Originally posted by atomicalex View Post
    Oh yes - forgot to note - I PASSED!!!!
    Great job! You only had to do it once.


    Oh man, does this mean the great stories are over? I looked forward to them. Oh well, now you have to write about your journey out into the world along. Looking towards it.

    Mary

    Leave a comment:


  • Markk9
    replied
    Originally posted by MsPotatoPotatoHead View Post
    As far as I'm concerned, the only bike manufacturer that got turn signals right is HD! One button on each side, press once to activate, press the same button again to de-activate, or they will self-cancel after a lean or a certain distance.
    I have a hard time when I go from the V-Rod to the Versys, H-D did get the turn signals right, and they really work well.

    Leave a comment:


  • atomicalex
    replied
    Originally posted by Trials View Post
    signal cancel is by thumb OR distance traveled OR by lean sensor.
    Well, that would go a long way to explaining the self-cancels that I couldn't explain to myself. Ok, maybe I need to continue re-evaluating....

    Detroit isn't that bad.....

    I'm glad people have liked the thread.

    Leave a comment:


  • MsPotatoPotatoHead
    replied
    I too have really enjoyed reading of your experiences. I really wish the US had such a comprehensive training program.

    I remember hating the turn signal system on my R1100GS, but my F650GS (single) had the typical Japanese motorbike turn signals. IIRC, the big BMW had one button on each side to activate the signals, but then there was a third, separate button that was in a really awkward place for canceling either signal. The vintage mine was ('95) did not have auto-cancel, either. I didn't ever get used to that turn signal system.

    As far as I'm concerned, the only bike manufacturer that got turn signals right is HD! One button on each side, press once to activate, press the same button again to de-activate, or they will self-cancel after a lean or a certain distance.

    Leave a comment:


  • guitardad
    replied
    Congratulations!!!!!!!! And thanks for letting us ride along with you. This has been a really fascinating thread for me.

    Leave a comment:


  • Trials
    replied
    I love m BMW turn signals! ...maybe they messed something up on the newer models. Left thumb left turn, right thumb right turn, signal cancel is by thumb OR distance traveled OR by lean sensor.

    My understanding is the training course in Ontario is closer to 1 week long and nearly 1000$. Any course is far better than a piece of paper that says you can ride from home straight to the training site the day of the test only, and if you bomb the test start pushing the bike home. That's how it was back in the day and thank goodness I passed first try because home was a 20k push.

    Just wait until you ride the Detroit debris field! You'll find yourself avoiding trashed picnic tables, car parts and discarded baby carriages on a daily basis riding the Detroit autobahn's

    Leave a comment:


  • atomicalex
    replied
    auf Deutsch, Genauso!!! (exactly!)

    Leave a comment:


  • subvetSSN606
    replied
    Originally posted by atomicalex View Post
    One other thing worth noting.... When I read back through the thread, I found it funny that I reacted to both bikes very badly at first, but warmed up. It seems that it took me a full session to get with the controls and become comfortable. I think the take-home there is that maybe the bike seems weird at first, but it's worth it to give it another try - by the time I got to my exam, I was actually more comfortable on the BMW than on the Kawi. But it took me some time to get there.

    Actually, I take back everything I said about the BMW, except the turn signal cancel. I still think that is weird.
    A related take-away from that is that when you change bikes... back it down and take some time to get to know it. Don't just jump out there and ride it like it was your old bike and expecting it to react the same.

    Tom

    Leave a comment:


  • atomicalex
    replied
    One other thing worth noting.... When I read back through the thread, I found it funny that I reacted to both bikes very badly at first, but warmed up. It seems that it took me a full session to get with the controls and become comfortable. I think the take-home there is that maybe the bike seems weird at first, but it's worth it to give it another try - by the time I got to my exam, I was actually more comfortable on the BMW than on the Kawi. But it took me some time to get there.

    Actually, I take back everything I said about the BMW, except the turn signal cancel. I still think that is weird.

    Leave a comment:


  • Chench53
    replied
    That is great, Congrats!! I enjoyed this thread too. And, I love your signature too, LOL!!
    Gerry

    Leave a comment:


  • atomicalex
    replied
    There are a few things about the German system that are definitely geared toward putting smarter rider on the road..

    During the general theory, particular attention is paid to trucks and bikes. So the car training includes a good amount of basics for being in traffic with other types of vehicles.
    You can't just show up for an exam - your instructor sets it up. So if you are not ready, you're not going to be tested. And I know people who are on their second or third driving instructor...
    The average for the practical is 1.7 tries, and 1.4 tries for the theory - people fail the exams pretty regularly, and that means more training hours.

    Are there squids over here? Sure. But I haven't seen more than a handful in a year, and I'm not sure they had German plates.

    Leave a comment:


  • WoodstockJeff
    replied
    Originally posted by Markk9 View Post
    Should be: There is no real discussion on strategies to manage a motorcycle in real world traffic.
    Depends upon who's class you attend. While the MSF curriculum is rather basic (it IS a "Basic" class, after all) information on street strategies, what you experience in a class can vary from getting through the section in as few minutes as possible to discussion on what factors affect your decisions to put the bike in a particular place on the road at any given moment.

    The "basics" are pretty simple, and they have been taught in Drivers Education in high school for decades. A bike has a few options a car doesn't have (positioning within a lane, potential for using smaller escape routes), and a few hazards as well (lack of stability, little protection when things go bad, and getting perceived as a hazard by others).

    When you're driving a car, you can practice the same strategies as you do on a bike, and will find yourself driving/riding more smoothly as you begin to anticipate problems before they are problems.

    It only takes about an hour to discuss and give examples of these street strategies. Here in the US, life on the road is both the practice area and the practical exam. Other places, you have someone watching you and giving you feedback as you practice, then get to prove what you learned.

    It's the head game that keeps you safe, and there isn't a whole lot that can be done to enforce its learning upon anyone. This topic shows the hurdles you have to go through to get a license in one country, but, how does it affect safety, other than reducing the number of people who bother going for the license? You still get idiots that pass the tests... as proven by YouTube. Britain has compulsory basic training (CBT) that includes on-street riding, to qualify for a "learner" bike or scooter for a couple of years. Want bigger, sooner? More training and and test to move to anything bigger than 15hp. And one of the biggest complaints is that the training still doesn't stop people from doing stupid things on bikes and killing themselves.

    Leave a comment:


  • Markk9
    replied
    Should be: There is no real discussion on strategies to manage a motorcycle in real world traffic.

    Leave a comment:


  • phendric
    replied
    Originally posted by Markk9 View Post
    There is real discussion on strategies to manage a motorcycle in real world traffic.
    ??? You lost me there. Who's having this discussion?

    P

    Leave a comment:

Working...
X