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Thread: First aid - helmet removal

  1. #21
    Contributor 8000 Posts! Ash's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by dalan

    I crash-tested my Schuberth - it stayed shut.

    Well, that says something! Let's not gear test anything else for a good while, Spring is right around the corner.

  2. #22
    Flirting With The Redline 2000 Posts! mechdziner714's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by asp125
    Stickied ......

    Eeeeewwwwww

  3. #23
    COBikerPup
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    Hey guys, I'm a nationally certified EMT and the best bet is what you guys are talking about. The only difference, is the person removing the helmet should also pull apart the sides of the helmet best they can, much easier to get the helmet off, and less chance of moving the head and/or cervical spine.

  4. #24
    Cuba Dad
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    I ordered and received the MICS Carrier from Cycle Gadgets a week or so ago. It took about a week to receive it.

    It really is FREE.... and it costs Cycle Gadgets .39 cents to mail it to you.

    This particular MICS Carrier DOES NOT warn against removing the helmet on the plastic pouch. It does allows you to provide detailed info regarding your medical history, emergency contacts, etc.

    Check the link:
    http://www.cyclegadgets.com/Products....asp?Item=MICS

    Of course, they do have all kinds of cool "stuff" for bikes and I am sure I will be buying some of the things theyoffer

  5. #25
    Flirting With The Redline 1000 Posts! christhisguy's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by COBikerPup
    Hey guys, I'm a nationally certified EMT and the best bet is what you guys are talking about. The only difference, is the person removing the helmet should also pull apart the sides of the helmet best they can, much easier to get the helmet off, and less chance of moving the head and/or cervical spine.
    Hey Pup, thanks for weighing in! It's great to have more professional reinforcement of this stuff.

    Safe to guess from your screen name that you're in CO? Whereabouts? If you're in the greater Denver area, Asp125, AnthonyC and I are usually up for a meet 'n greet, even if we're not riding there. [Ok that's more of an issue for Mr. Dirtbike - yours truly - but hey I get there.]

    Anyway welcome aboard! Sorry if I missed an intro elsewhere... whatcha ride? ...or hope to ride? Feel free to start your own thread.

    Cheers.
    Quote Originally Posted by wraith0078 View Post
    I started to get worried when I was looking for a rear shock from a Gixxer 1000 for the Bandit...
    Current: '93 Yamaha Seca II "Tonbo"
    BITD: '00 Honda XR250R, '95 Yamaha RT 180

  6. #26
    Flirting With The Redline Pittsburgh's Avatar
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    Exclamation Powerpoint for head injuries

    http://rapidshare.de/files/30462802/ch23.ppt.html

    copy and paste, it's from my medic class.
    1973 Honda CB750-four

  7. #27
    RiderCoach 1000 Posts! lionlady's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Pittsburgh
    http://rapidshare.de/files/30462802/ch23.ppt.html

    copy and paste, it's from my medic class.
    "RapidShare file deleted"

    P
    If you are always trying to be normal, you'll never know how amazing you can be. -Maya Angelou

  8. #28
    Senior Moderator We've stopped counting... subvetSSN606's Avatar
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    Oh well. I wish information like that was always available to all for free... but there you go.



    Tom
    In the end, regrets rarely come from things done, but from things not even tried.


  9. #29
    Flirting With The Redline 2000 Posts! blueglassman's Avatar
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    Well, I have to add something here. I've posted a couple of times about how I had a pretty nasty accident (hit and run, damn boston drivers) late summer of 2005. At that point I had been riding for about 2 months. I had spent quite a bit of time here and at the old BB forum before I actually bought the bike (God rest her soul) and I was aware that it could be dangerous to take the lid off. The problem for me was that after highsiding and quite a good number of tumbles (The officer on the scene said I was 80 feet from the curb) I wanted my lid OFF. I couln't get up, mostly from the pain in my back / hips and the 1/2 motorcycle on top of me. I knew it wasn't the best idea, but after something like that sometimes it's hard to pay attention to the logical side of your brain. I still regret asking my friend to help me do it, he protested taking the lid off but I made him help me. Not smart, I know. Even those of us who pay attention to safety, wearing gear, etc still make errors in judgement. If I were in the same situation again, I would think better of taking it off, though I hope I won't have to make that decision again.
    Triumph!!!!!

  10. #30
    I would have to agree with the Medics/EMTs so far in the thread. I remember being on scene to a motorcycle accident where the guy's helmet was removed by bystanders. He ended up being paralyzed due to improper removal. When we got on scene, bystanders where trying to help him sit up. Another thought, leave the person where they lay unless it is unsafe for them and unsafe for you. Make sure their neck/spine is stabilized (aka stays in one position). If you have to move them, make sure their neck/spine is being supported. It sucks to survive a crash only to be paralyzed by bystanders.

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