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Thread: Trying to Give Up Riding

  1. #31
    Flirting With The Redline 8000 Posts! Trials's Avatar
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    Oh and my knee has healed up real well, now I just need to act young again.

  2. #32
    Flirting With The Redline 2000 Posts! Sorg67's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Trials View Post
    I still like the cheap ones you have to clean and oil all the time,
    otherwise the cheapest o-ring chain I can buy and replace it often.

    It's one of the more disposable items on the bike if you want your sprockets to last more then one chain.

    ... at supper time an hour ago my wife said "why is Josh ordering new sprockets for a 2 year old bike? you just gave him a new chain"
    Thanks!

    I do not mind paying up for something that is going to last. The first chain lasted 6 years / 10,000 miles and the sprockets still have nice square top teeth. Owners manual calls for changing chain at 10,000 miles. I would like to get something that will last another 10,000 miles. I am not super good about keeping up with cleaning and lubing. So I am looking for something that will stand up to some neglect and abuse. I have seen chains from $40 to $200 US. Don’t want to spend $200 if I do not have to but I do not want to get something that is going to be difficult. I would like an easy master link to work with.

  3. #33
    Flirting With The Redline 8000 Posts! Trials's Avatar
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    Real nice guy sent me one for free recently it's about a 80 dollar regular 520 roller chain.
    Sealed chain will cost about twice that but they really don't last any longer and they are not one bit stronger or any more resistant to wear.
    I like the cir-clip master links too, it simplifies cleaning and servicing.

    Plus your dollar is worth 36% more then ours right now.

  4. #34
    Flirting With The Redline 2000 Posts! Sorg67's Avatar
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    So a “regular” 520 chain is right for CB 500X?

  5. #35
    Flirting With The Redline 8000 Posts! Trials's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Sorg67 View Post
    So a “regular” 520 chain is right for CB 500X?
    That's a trick question, I don't know for sure the CB500X even takes a 520 chain but I would imagine it came with a sealed chain, most buyers expect that on anything other then a competition motorcycle or a very cheap motorcycle.

  6. #36
    Flirting With The Redline 8000 Posts! Trials's Avatar
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    "STOCK SIZES: Chain - 112 Links / 520 Pitch" Seems it does,
    it's a super common chain size.

  7. #37
    Flirting With The Redline 2000 Posts! Sorg67's Avatar
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    More research suggests 520 is right. I do not know about length, but it seems they come long and you cut off excess.

    I have been advised not to use a “clip” master link. I should use a rivet link and I need a special tool properly mash the rivet. I am also told I need a caliper to make sure I get it done correctly.

    Sound right? I am getting nervous this may be more difficult than I thought. On the other hand, I will probably be extra careful and do it more precisely than a mechanic would do it. Will take me ten times as long. But I will probably get it right.

  8. #38
    Flirting With The Redline 8000 Posts! Trials's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Sorg67 View Post
    More research suggests 520 is right. I do not know about length, but it seems they come long and you cut off excess.

    I have been advised not to use a “clip” master link. I should use a rivet link and I need a special tool properly mash the rivet. I am also told I need a caliper to make sure I get it done correctly.

    Sound right? I am getting nervous this may be more difficult than I thought. On the other hand, I will probably be extra careful and do it more precisely than a mechanic would do it. Will take me ten times as long. But I will probably get it right.
    I've always had to shorten the chains I buy, it's easier to shorten them then you might think. I use cir-clip master links, never had a problem with one yet so I don't expect they will fail unless I start installing them incorrectly. Rivet master links are a one shot deal, you mush a tiny bit of metal over in the shape of a rivet and the only way to remove it again is to destroy it. Some people seem to think that a tiny bit of mushed over malleable steel is better then a spring clip in a machined grove ymmv. Either way there should never be any sideways forces on the chain that would stress the side plates on the master links anyway, the stress it all tensile and roller friction.

    For the rivet link you will need a rivet flare tool or to improvise one. To shorten a chain, you just grind the rivet heads flat with an outside plate on one side only and then tap it apart with a hammer and a nail or punch, super easy. If it's a sealed chain, don't forget to put the o-rings on the chain in the right places before you rivet it. Seen that done wrong at least once, they put two o-rings on the same side!

    If you save up all the short lengths of chain you collect over the years you can join them all together with master links and make a cost free chain

    "I am also told I need a caliper to make sure I get it done correctly." No idea what that is about, a calliper as in the measuring device? Why! It's just a roller chain, ancient technology that's been used in a billion different applications. I had to figure out how to shorten a motorcycle chains before I even reached puberty I think you can handle it.

    How to video link if you need it: https://youtu.be/YrGFe0Ikr5o Never had such a thing in the olden days.
    Last edited by Trials; 06-20-2020 at 07:27 AM.

  9. #39
    RiderCoach 5000 Posts! NORTY's Avatar
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    Yup, gotta agree, regarding the "clip style" master. As long as it's installed correctly, and the clip is fully seated, you should have no problem. Using a clip style allows removal/service of said chain, should it require it.

    Once you have a master that requires "mushrooming" the pins, then you're stuck with it, until you cut it off.

    Hey, speaking of cutting chains...has anyone noticed the plates are only "case hardened?" Once you saw thru the case, the metal underneath is almost "butter" soft. I was truly surprised by this. And this was on a decent "quality" chain...

    Chains wear in numerous places. Forget about the internal pins for a moment, and let's just talk about the rollers that mate to the tooth faces of the sprockets. It is this interaction that causes most of the "driveline loss" with chains/sprockets. As the rollers slide over the sides of the teeth, it creates heat from friction. If it is "dry" you can expect accelerated wear on the rollers, (which is hard to see, without a mic,) or the tooth face surfaces, which is very easy to see wear. Sides of the teeth are even easier to see wear patterns. (This can also be a result of alignment issues.)
    One way to minimize this wear is to place a lubricant between the tooth face, and the chain roller. Unfortunately, due to the "hostile environments" we ask our chains to operate, this usually attracts more dirt/dust, thus accelerating the very wear we are trying to mitigate. The ultimate solution would be an enclosed chain drive system. (Don't laugh, it's been done before.)

    Anyway, that's enough about "chain talk!"
    Knowledge speaks, wisdom listens.

  10. #40
    Flirting With The Redline 10,000 Posts! Shadow Shack's Avatar
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    I'm a big fan of EK and RK chains along with SunStar sprockets, I get 20K+ miles from a set and I am far from religious about chain maintenance. Granted I live in a dry climate so they don't get as dirty or gunked up either.

    I just put a new 520 chain on our Rebel 4K miles ago, lubed it 2K ago (which means I probably should do that again soon). Clip-type master links are easy if you don't have a chain tool (which I don't).

    BelRay SuperClean is my choice of chain lube, applied immediately after a ride on a warm chain and allowed to cure for at least 12 hours. I get minimal sling from that pattern, and even less the more it sits after a lube. The worst thing you can do is lube a cold chain just before going out for a ride, as it all slings off and you end up with the same amount of lube remaining on the chain as you had before lubing it.
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