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Thread: Safe to ride CB 500 X with loose chain?

  1. #21
    RiderCoach 5000 Posts! NORTY's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Shadow Shack View Post
    Just realize that there is a point where the chain has stretched enough that no amount of tightening will keep it serviceable. When it gets to that point, you can tighten it to spec before heading out and less than a block later it will be rattling and clattering again. The last thing you want is for the chain to come off one of the sprockets while moving. I've seen the results and it can cause a lot of extra damage that a replacement chain (and sprockets) could have avoided.


    P.S. if the PO of your bike did this and you haven't discovered it until chain replacement time, you're beyond screwed:



    Holy crap! And it's WELDED to the CS! Surprised the bearing/seal survived the intense heat generated. Can't think of a way to change the sprocket either. Not cut it off as the heat would soften the steel shaft. Not even try to trim off the circumference of the "nubs," and build a new sprocket over the welded carrier. Nope, I got nuthin'.
    Knowledge speaks, wisdom listens.

  2. #22
    Flirting With The Redline 10,000 Posts! Shadow Shack's Avatar
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    Yep, beyond screwed.
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  3. #23
    Flirting With The Redline 2000 Posts! Sorg67's Avatar
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    I have examined the front sprocket and it looks really good to me. I have cleaned and lubed the chain a few times without success in getting the kinks out. Although they are really more accurately described as stiff links. They smooth out going around both front and rear sprocket.

    Bike rides really smoothly. Going to align the chain then ride it for a bit.

    Seems like the only downside to using this chain for a while would be wear and tear on the sprockets which would not matter if I am going to change the sprockets when I change the chain anyway.

    To change the chain I would either need another tool or pay a mechanic. So I think I may wait a bit.

    Am I missing anything?

  4. #24
    Flirting With The Redline 8000 Posts! Trials's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Sorg67 View Post
    ...
    To change the chain I would either need another tool or pay a mechanic. So I think I may wait a bit.

    Am I missing anything?
    Ya, the part where you do it yourself Bring it here and I'll show you how to do it.


    The stiff links are the ones that have rust inside them instead of grease and the o-ring seals on those links have been compromised. You won't know how stretched it is until you buy a new chain and lay it along side the old one.

  5. #25
    Flirting With The Redline 8000 Posts! Trials's Avatar
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    You know how to break a chain yes?

    ... grind the rivet heads completely off of a link, the original rivet master link or any other would be fine because either way you are going to have to use a master link to make the chain endless again. Pry or hammer tap the outside plate that you just ground away from the link, the rest will fall apart.

    If you are installing a chain that comes with a cir-clip master link you will want a pair of most any kind of pliers to install it. If you have to shorten the chain you bought you grind the rivet heads completely off one of the links and that is the one that gets replaced by your master link. If your replacement chain is another sealed chain don't forget to install the o-rings that came with the new master link.

  6. #26
    Flirting With The Redline 8000 Posts! Trials's Avatar
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    I just noticed there are about a million you tube videos out there showing a chain being taken apart using a special too you seriously do Not need one to do the job.
    :I could do it with a good hand file a blunt rock and a used nail.

  7. #27
    Flirting With The Redline 2000 Posts! Sorg67's Avatar
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    I have looked at several of those videos too. I am sure I could do it. Does not look that hard. Good to know that I do not need the tool. Although I would probably use one anyway.

    My specific question is whether I am risking any major damage to anything other than wear and tear on the sprockets by running a chain with a few stiff links. If I am going to replace the sprockets when I replace the chain anyway, then it seems it is no big deal to wait if wear and tear on the sprockets is the only downside to waiting.

  8. #28
    Flirting With The Redline 8000 Posts! Trials's Avatar
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    Is almost insignificant but it is certainly not a good thing to run a chain until it deforms the sprockets,
    you are adding rolling resistance that results in performance loss vibration and added fuel consumption
    and killing 2 sprockets that can easy last 3 or 4 chains.

  9. #29
    Flirting With The Redline 2000 Posts! Sorg67's Avatar
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    So if I want to get a few chains through these sprockets then changing the chain soon is important.

    If I am going to follow the practice of changing chains and sprockets at the same time, then I just lose a little fuel economy and performance. Correct?

  10. #30
    Flirting With The Redline 8000 Posts! Trials's Avatar
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    Yep that's accurate.
    fuel economy performance additional parts costs and probably encountering some additional vibration.

    Not something you want to do with the bikes I ride because they only run chains for the performance advantage
    and my parts come from another planet like Italy.

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