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Thread: Mid to Late 90s Dynas

  1. #1

    Mid to Late 90s Dynas

    Just thought I'd throw this out there for discussion...

    Have been browsing Craigslist for a while now, and it's just kind of weird how often I see something I like, click on the link and it turns out to be a 90s era Wide Glide.

    A little bit of research shows me that it's actually extremely close to the weight of my current '(re)-trainer' V-Star 650.

    I like what I've read about the engines on that eras Harley. Supposedly very reliable.

    There is a bit more HP and torque, but it doesn't seem to extreme of a jump.

    The V-star just doesn't seem to feel right, as a highway cruiser that is (traffic flows between 65-80 mph). Just a bit small and underpowered. Am currently driving about an hour each way to and from, and am thinking (maybe hoping) that one of these Wide Glides may be a logical option... given that I'm not wanting to move up to a full touring model.

    So,.... again.... just throwing it out for some discussion and insight from the more experienced.
    Last edited by CountofQ; 04-19-2019 at 10:22 PM.

  2. #2
    RiderCoach 4000 Posts! AZridered's Avatar
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    Dynas have become quite popular since they were discontinued as a separate model line last year. Prices have slid up on what used to not be a teribly strong seller.

  3. #3
    Quote Originally Posted by AZridered View Post
    Dynas have become quite popular since they were discontinued as a separate model line last year. Prices have slid up on what used to not be a teribly strong seller.
    Around here, the EVO era models are typically 7000 or less. A few higher. Of course we are talking 20 plus years old bikes.

  4. #4
    RiderCoach 5000 Posts! NORTY's Avatar
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    Cool Dyna's rock!

    I bought an FXD back in 1994. It was a '95 model. I rode that bike for 21 years. Put a fair amount of miles on that EVO too. Like any Harley, the EVO did have an Achille's heel. This being the ICB. The inner cam bearing (ICB.) from Harley just wasn't up to the stresses that camshafts put on them. They usually lasted about 10,000-20,000 miles before they literally beat the outside race into fragments. The oil would then carry these fragments thu-out the engine, causing all kinds of damage. Once the bearing was replaced with a better Torrington, it lasted forever. The bike sounded like a HD should. The EVO can withstand an ultra low RPM idle (650-700), and survive. The new twinkies and "8's" can't do this today. They need 1000 RPM to keep from punishing their "big ends." Too low an idle RPM shocks the big end/crank journals.
    Figure a clutch cable lasts about 55,000-60,000 miles and/or about a half million actuations. I went thru 3 or 4 cables on my FXD. Never did need to replace the clutch itself. Never even had to adjust it in fact. Speaking of clutch cable effort, you may want to install a Burley EZ Boy clutch pull reduction device. They reduce clutch pull effort by 40%, and I believe it. Also makes the friction zone 40% wider too. Best $25 you'll ever spend.
    Anyway, back to the Dyna. Mine weighed 598 (according to the firm that designed/built the bike.) Mine was modded to the "Stage II" level. When Harleys are modded, they get thirsty. I went thru 5 gallons of gas in 165 miles. All 1995 Dyna's are carbed, btw. Keep this in mind as fuels gain alcohol percentages...(It's why I got rid of my Dyna, for the most part.)
    I got a 2016 Dyna to replace my old FXD with an FXDL (low.) It's a fuels and gets 200+ miles per 5 gallon tank. This is great when you run extended legs out in the desert where gas may not be for "another 120 miles..." (Remember Wild Hogs?) Well, there's a speck of truth to this.


    Come to think of it, I have too many bikes in my garage, so I need to let one go, and it's my Harley Dyna Lowrider. 19,000 miles and it can be yours, if the price is right!
    Last edited by NORTY; 04-22-2019 at 12:05 AM. Reason: add'l info
    Knowledge speaks, wisdom listens.

  5. #5
    Quote Originally Posted by NORTY View Post
    I bought an FXD back in 1994. It was a '95 model. I rode that bike for 21 years. Put a fair amount of miles on that EVO too. Like any Harley, the EVO did have an Achille's heel. This being the ICB. The inner cam bearing (ICB.) from Harley just wasn't up to the stresses that camshafts put on them. They usually lasted about 10,000-20,000 miles before they literally beat the outside race into fragments. The oil would then carry these fragments thu-out the engine, causing all kinds of damage. Once the bearing was replaced with a better Torrington, it lasted forever. The bike sounded like a HD should. The EVO can withstand an ultra low RPM idle (650-700), and survive. The new twinkies and "8's" can't do this today. They need 1000 RPM to keep from punishing their "big ends." Too low an idle RPM shocks the big end/crank journals.
    Figure a clutch cable lasts about 55,000-60,000 miles and/or about a half million actuations. I went thru 3 or 4 cables on my FXD. Never did need to replace the clutch itself. Never even had to adjust it in fact. Speaking of clutch cable effort, you may want to install a Burley EZ Boy clutch pull reduction device. They reduce clutch pull effort by 40%, and I believe it. Also makes the friction zone 40% wider too. Best $25 you'll ever spend.
    Anyway, back to the Dyna. Mine weighed 598 (according to the firm that designed/built the bike.) Mine was modded to the "Stage II" level. When Harleys are modded, they get thirsty. I went thru 5 gallons of gas in 165 miles. All 1995 Dyna's are carbed, btw. Keep this in mind as fuels gain alcohol percentages...(It's why I got rid of my Dyna, for the most part.)
    I got a 2016 Dyna to replace my old FXD with an FXDL (low.) It's a fuels and gets 200+ miles per 5 gallon tank. This is great when you run extended legs out in the desert where gas may not be for "another 120 miles..." (Remember Wild Hogs?) Well, there's a speck of truth to this.


    Come to think of it, I have too many bikes in my garage, so I need to let one go, and it's my Harley Dyna Lowrider. 19,000 miles and it can be yours, if the price is right!
    From a non-mechanic, what does the alcohol content have to due with the carb? I thought the changes in fuel affected pistons? Anyway... enlighten me to the problems of our changing fuels and the EVO, please.

    So for cruising the freeways & turnpikes around 80-85 mph (Oklahoma is raising speed limits), your vote would be YES? There is a lot of discussion on the HDForums about how much the EVO vibrates around those speeds. A "rumbling freight train" is a term that has popped up in threads a few times. Many there recommend moving up to a touring model. What's your take? I'm talking EVO era dynas, specifically.

  6. #6
    Flirting With The Redline 8000 Posts! Trials's Avatar
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    Ethanol is hygroscopic and has the ability to absorb its weight in water, which does not necessarily stay absorbed. Carburetors carry fuel in an atmosphere vented fuel/float bowl unlike fuel injection systems which are largely closed circuit systems with the fuel tank being the only reservoir vented to the atmosphere.


    Nobody buys a Harley thinking the motor will not vibrate, I find it highly entertaining to sit beside one at a street light and watch the thing try to shake parts off.

  7. #7
    Flirting With The Redline 8000 Posts! Trials's Avatar
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    An additional issue with blended fuels is the stoichiometric ratio (the ratio of air to fuel mix necessary to achieve complete combustion)
    Carburetors are manually adjusted to suit the fuel and environment being used, modern computer controlled fuel injection systems attempt to adjust to the fuel/air ratios to suit atmospheric pressures and operating temperatures on the fly.

  8. #8
    Quote Originally Posted by Trials View Post
    Ethanol is hygroscopic and has the ability to absorb its weight in water, which does not necessarily stay absorbed. Carburetors carry fuel in an atmosphere vented fuel/float bowl unlike fuel injection systems which are largely closed circuit systems with the fuel tank being the only reservoir vented to the atmosphere.

    Nobody buys a Harley thinking the motor will not vibrate, I find it highly entertaining to sit beside one at a street light and watch the thing try to shake parts off.

    Quote Originally Posted by Trials View Post
    An additional issue with blended fuels is the stoichiometric ratio (the ratio of air to fuel mix necessary to achieve complete combustion)
    Carburetors are manually adjusted to suit the fuel and environment being used, modern computer controlled fuel injection systems attempt to adjust to the fuel/air ratios to suit atmospheric pressures and operating temperatures on the fly
    .

    I'm not sure how either of these translates to the "keep this in mind as alcohol content increases" statement in the previous post, or being a reason to sell the Evo era Dyna. I mean... My V star has two carbs... what am I supposed to be mindful of? I get no ethanol when possible, most of the time I'm filling up with up to 10%. I'm pretty sure the owners manual said this is fine. What is the "NET EFFECT" of having the carb with today's blended fuels?

    Of course I expect it to vibrate. They state it gets pretty extreme at those speeds. Just asking for input from someone here, who happens to have owned the same, and only off by one year, the ride I am considering.
    Last edited by CountofQ; 04-23-2019 at 04:06 PM.

  9. #9
    Flirting With The Redline 8000 Posts! Trials's Avatar
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    Norty is definitely the man to ask for clarification he knows about oxygenated fuels and Harley's

    Last edited by Trials; 04-23-2019 at 04:34 PM.

  10. #10
    RiderCoach 4000 Posts! AZridered's Avatar
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    Ethanol in the fuel means that there is less gasoline. With a fuel injected, computer controlled, engine, the system will automatically compensate for the slight reduction in fuel content and increase in oxygen. Very few carbureted systems are able to do the same. In those cases, manual adjustment is needed. Up to 10% ethanol content is within the reasonable range for nearly all carbureted engines. Nearing 15% is when jetting adjustments really need to be made. Even with modern computer controlled EFI, 15% ethanol is pushing the system's limits.

    With close to 40 years use of alcohol containing fuel (started out being called gasohol) I have yet to encounter any difficulty or fuel system issues. Nothing dissolved, nothing corroded, nothing deteriorated. When switching a high mileage vehicle from regular gas to oxygenated fuel, it is probably a good idea to change the fuel filter(s) after a few tanks of fuel. Ethanol does a very good job of cleaning everything it flows through and the crud will be caught by the filter. After that, the system stays clean.

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