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Thread: Suspension

  1. #11
    Flirting With The Redline 2000 Posts! Sorg67's Avatar
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    I do not have the experience to describe my suspension experience in the terms you describe them. The KLX and DRZ feel a lot more solid and stable having "stiffened" the suspension - reduce the sag, I guess. Anyway, they feel a lot better, but I cannot say exactly how that translates into specific performance improvements.

    The 1992 softail was the most dramatic improvement. Replaced front and rear and put it back up to stock height. Difference was dramatic. Admittedly it was improving from terrible to really bad. But it was a meaningful experience and really bad was good enough if it take it easy.

    Sold that bike, but I could see myself owning another. It was a very fun bike to ride. But you had to respect the tonnage and related limits. Most of my near mishaps were on that bike. Probably not the ideal bike at this stage in my riding career. Still, I think it is safe if you are smart about how you ride. Of course, that could be my inexperience talking. Perhaps I just never encountered a circumstance that revealed its limitations.

  2. #12
    RiderCoach 4000 Posts! AZridered's Avatar
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    Sag is the term used to express how the springs support the weight of the motorcycle, or motorcycle and rider. Static Sag is the comparison between the height of the bike with the suspension fully extended and the resting height of the bike, simply supported by the springs. Commonly, Static Sag is somewhere in the range of 10 to 20 percent of the total possible suspension movement. Rider Sag is the comparison between the height of the bike with the suspension fully extended and the resting height of the motorcycle with a rider seated, feet on the foot rests. Rider Sag is commonly in the range of 25 to 30 percent of the total possible suspension travel.

    Typically, motorcycles with longer suspension travel (6" or more) are set nearer the large end of the Sag range and motorcycles with shorter travel (4" and less) are nearer the smaller end of the range. When the correct springs are installed, Sag is adjusted by changing the amount of pre-load compression applied to the springs. The rear springs are usually readily adjustable because carrying weight on the bike, a passenger or gear, mostly affects the rear suspension. Adjusting a notched collar, a threaded ring, or maybe just turning a knob, will add enough pre-load compression to the spring to bring the motorcycle back up to a reasonable Rider Sag height. Sometimes the front suspension has external spring pre-load adjustment but all front forks can have their pre-load adjusted internally by adding or removing spacers.

  3. #13
    RiderCoach 10,000 Posts! SoCal LabRat's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Joseph Hanna View Post
    Took my Street Triple to a suspension specialist here in the Valley today. It took two or three rides for them to hone in on things and I’m not positive we’re 100% there yet. (The cost of the service includes a year of adjustments if required)....

    What difference!
    May I ask where you took it? It may still be farther than I'm willing to travel but I think I need to have mine looked at. Honestly I ride nowhere near probably even 70% of my limit on the street. But I'm thinking that having it set up for me would still be good in every way. There is a stretch of freeway that is so jarring to ride on the Street Triple that I have to clamp my teeth together when riding. It's irregularities are soaked up by the soft Tiger suspension, so I'm thinking my front end is probably over sprung as well.
    ~Teri
    Quote Originally Posted by Bugguts View Post
    Hey, at my age running hot and loss of spark is a common problem.
    2013 Triumph Tiger 800
    2018 Triumph Street Triple R - Low
    2015 Ninja 300 (sold to a student rider, renamed Lloyd)


  4. #14
    RiderCoach 5000 Posts! NORTY's Avatar
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    SCLR~ You've been to Racetech before, but it comes at a cost. You can also take it to Lee's Cycle in Sandy Eggo. They set bikes up for the track. Or, you can let Norty mess it up for you. (He charges a double batch of tollhouse cookies for his expertise.)

    On second thought, you may want to skip that last option as Norty doesn't remember near what he used to. (Heck, he was lost in a parking lot full of Corvettes an hour ago...)
    Knowledge speaks, wisdom listens.

  5. #15
    Flirting With The Redline 8000 Posts! Trials's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by SoCal LabRat View Post
    May I ask where you took it? It may still be farther than I'm willing to travel but I think I need to have mine looked at. Honestly I ride nowhere near probably even 70% of my limit on the street. But I'm thinking that having it set up for me would still be good in every way. There is a stretch of freeway that is so jarring to ride on the Street Triple that I have to clamp my teeth together when riding. It's irregularities are soaked up by the soft Tiger suspension, so I'm thinking my front end is probably over sprung as well.
    In the absence of a compression dampening adjuster, is cheap and easy to just do a fork oil change to 5 weight.
    imho thin oil makes for a more lively suspension, thick oil makes it retarded.
    Last edited by Trials; 11-10-2018 at 05:26 PM. Reason: suppose the same goes for rebound dampening

  6. #16
    RiderCoach 10,000 Posts! SoCal LabRat's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Trials View Post
    In the absence of a compression dampening adjuster, is cheap and easy to just do a fork oil change to 5 weight.
    imho thin oil makes for a more lively suspension, thick oil makes it retarded.
    I have the R model so the front end is adjustable.


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    ~Teri
    Quote Originally Posted by Bugguts View Post
    Hey, at my age running hot and loss of spark is a common problem.
    2013 Triumph Tiger 800
    2018 Triumph Street Triple R - Low
    2015 Ninja 300 (sold to a student rider, renamed Lloyd)


  7. #17
    Flirting With The Redline 8000 Posts! Trials's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by SoCal LabRat View Post
    I have the R model so the front end is adjustable.
    Sweet! roll back the compression dampening enough that you can notice a difference and if that helps.
    Spring rates other then preload are a more expensive to mess with so resort to those last. Preload can make a lot of difference on small bumps and a light rider like you and I

  8. #18
    Miles of smiles We've stopped counting... asp125's Avatar
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    Back in the day I had my Gixxer set up by a local race mechanic. At first I was skeptical because the bike felt way too soft around town. But it came alive in the canyons and soaked up bumps without being wallowy. It gave me a world of confidence in trusting the lean.
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  9. #19
    Flirting With The Redline 2000 Posts! Sorg67's Avatar
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    Would there be any merit to setting up the suspension of a bike for beginners with very soft suspension? Provide the opportunity to see the impact of acceleration, deceleration, body position, etc. as noticeably as possible. Then gradually stiffen it up to get a feel for the difference?

    Not that I am actually going to do that.... too much work. Right now I am happy with the way my bikes ride. But then again, that happiness is a result of ignorance. Don't know enough to know what could be better.

  10. #20
    Flirting With The Redline Joseph Hanna's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by SoCal LabRat View Post
    May I ask where you took it? It may still be farther than I'm willing to travel but I think I need to have mine looked at. Honestly I ride nowhere near probably even 70% of my limit on the street. But I'm thinking that having it set up for me would still be good in every way. There is a stretch of freeway that is so jarring to ride on the Street Triple that I have to clamp my teeth together when riding. It's irregularities are soaked up by the soft Tiger suspension, so I'm thinking my front end is probably over sprung as well.
    Yes of course.... I would have liked to go to Racetech but just didn't have the time to jaunt out to Pomona. A friend hooked me up with a guy who works at ESP in Glendale. They're heavily into dirt machines but they know suspensions.

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