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Thread: Cold Weather Gear

  1. #1
    Flirting With The Redline 2000 Posts! Sorg67's Avatar
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    Cold Weather Gear

    I have been long planning a trip to see my son in Alabama. Maybe it will happen this spring. I may have to deal with temperatures anywhere between the low 40's and mid 80's. When we have had some cold snaps here, I have tested my gear.

    My cold weather gear is my summer mesh gear with my rain gear on top. I have warm gauntlet gloves. With a few layers, I found that comfortable for about a half an hour in the high 30's. I might last an hour, but I suspect I would be ready for a break by then. I can see how heated grips would be very nice for riding at that temperature for a long time.

    But I think I could be okay since if it is high 30's or low 40's, that is probably early morning and I would be ready for breakfast in an hour or so. With a warm up break and the outside temperature would probably warm up a bit, I think that could work. Then I could shed layers and change to a lighter glove as it gets warmer.

    I also use a neck protector which helps a lot.

    I have found that my visor fogs in the cold. I have to leave it cracked open a bit. Any suggestions for that? There is a vent on the chin that appears to be for the purpose of directing air flow to reduce fogging. But it does not work really well. May also be my glasses since I wear prescription glasses under my helmet.

  2. #2
    RiderCoach 4000 Posts! AZridered's Avatar
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    Fogging eye protection is always a problem. There are various sprays and liquids which can reduce fogging. The liquid which I have used most is made by Rain-X. It has to be applied every few days, but it works well.

    An electric jacket liner or vest could be worth considering. You can adjust for conditions without stopping. Not cheap though.

  3. #3
    Flirting With The Redline 2000 Posts! Sorg67's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by AZridered View Post
    Fogging eye protection is always a problem. There are various sprays and liquids which can reduce fogging. The liquid which I have used most is made by Rain-X. It has to be applied every few days, but it works well..
    Is there any problem using those substances on photo-sensitive transition lenses?

    Quote Originally Posted by AZridered View Post
    An electric jacket liner or vest could be worth considering. You can adjust for conditions without stopping. Not cheap though.
    I can see how that would be nice. I suppose that would be better than layers in that you could dial it up and down for comfort a lot easier than adding and shedding layers. I would probably invest in that if I was going to do a lot of cold weather riding.

    I felt pretty comfortable with my layering system riding in the high 30's. But that was a short distance. I suppose being on the bike all day would be a different story.

  4. #4
    Flirting With The Redline Mad Matt's Avatar
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    For occasional use, you can get those little chemical handwarmer things that go inside your gloves. They’re surprisingly effective.

  5. #5
    Flirting With The Redline 2000 Posts! Sorg67's Avatar
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    That is a good idea Matt. Thanks!

  6. #6
    Flirting With The Redline Joseph Hanna's Avatar
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    For fogging I’ve yet to find any solution more effective than pin-locks. If your helmet provides, that’s the route to go. Can’t help much with the cold weather gear as it’s not all that applicable to SoCal weather. Some very early morning rides it down in the low 50 but it doesn’t stay there for long, the sun always wins. It’s just a matter of hanging there long enough for the sun to make its mark!

  7. #7
    As someone whose riding climate is similar to yours, and therefore I am used to dealing with Cold/Warm/Cold rides, I'll suggest the following:

    * Thumbs up on the rain gear outer layer.
    * If your mesh gear has a liner, use it. You can remove it (and the rain gear) as the temps get hotter each day.
    * Heated grips are awesome, but I've found that the backs of my hands and my fingertips stay cold. I'd augment heated grips with hand guards or just use Hippo Hands (or something similar.
    * Do *not* forget your feet. Layer up your socks or get heated socks.

    Hope This Helps.
    '02 Shadow Spirit 750 - The R-Honda TRADED IN
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    "I own a Goldwing...when I get cold, I just turn on the autopilot and go downstairs and sit in front of the fireplace and drink hot chocolate. The bike beeps to let me know when we're starting our final approach." -- shonuff

  8. #8
    RiderCoach 4000 Posts! AZridered's Avatar
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    I was going to mention Pinlock. That is the ultimate solution. What a Pinlock shield insert does is to create a double-pane faceshield. The Pinlock insert is a bit smaller than the helmet's eyeport and the insert is locked into place by a pair of pins which are permanently attached to the faceshield. Pinlock. the insert itself is held a very small distance away from the main shield and therefore does not get too cold on the 'other' side. In that way, the insert stays relatively warm so breath vapor tends to not condense on the surface.

    If you ride a lot in condensing conditions a Pinlock setup is well worth the price. If the conditions are only occasional, then the surface treatments are probably a better choice. If you can find one, a company called Fog City used to manufacture a similar insert which was less durable and was held in place with adhesive edging. It was as effective as Pinlock and cost a lot less. With either setup, the fitment is generally helmet faceshield specific.

  9. #9
    Quote Originally Posted by Mad Matt View Post
    For occasional use, you can get those little chemical handwarmer things that go inside your gloves. They’re surprisingly effective.
    I used them, on occasion, on my Shadow. Took a while to get used to SUPER thick palms. I have small hands, so it made gripping the grips a little awkward until I got used to them. I also found that my fingers stayed cold. They're why I was happy Eyegore has heated grips. My fingers (except the tips) stay warm when they're on.
    '02 Shadow Spirit 750 - The R-Honda TRADED IN
    '07 BMW F800 ST - Eyegor TRADED IN
    '17 Kawasaki Versys 650 LT - Phantom

    "I own a Goldwing...when I get cold, I just turn on the autopilot and go downstairs and sit in front of the fireplace and drink hot chocolate. The bike beeps to let me know when we're starting our final approach." -- shonuff

  10. #10
    At what speeds have you tested your layering? Remember, the faster you go, the lower the windchill factor. Back in Iowa, I used to get away with a lot of bundling riding around town at 40-45mph in the upper 20's-upper 40's. But even though I'm 300 miles further south now, most of my riding is rural at 55mph+, and for longer periods of time between stops, so I invested in a wired heated jacket liner and gloves last year. I generally don't head out unless it's above freezing and the heated gear works great!! Sometimes I'll add sport-type wicking long underwear to the mix. If it's pushing 50 degrees and sunny, I'll revert back to bundling. For my lower half, I have a rain/cold weather liner in my Motoport pants, Smartwool socks (sometimes adding an ankle-length pair to keep my toes warmer)and I wear NEOS boot covers over my boots.

    +1 on the Pinlock! Good call on the neck cover. I find that if my neck is warm, it makes all the difference in the world. My jacket liner must have extra heating elements in the neck because it gets super toasty!

    Lori
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