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Thread: Fuel Leak drz 400 S

  1. #31
    Flirting With The Redline Mad Matt's Avatar
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    Isolating and testing the needle valve is a great idea.

  2. #32
    Flirting With The Redline 8000 Posts! Trials's Avatar
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    wow there are some really hard to watch videos out there on 'testing float needle and seat'
    check them out at your own risk, but at least they will give you the basic concept.
    Chances are you won't need to perform a float level adjustment unless somebody has been in there and messed with it, but then again :/ sounds like that may have already happened.

    How much is a new carb? they are usually out of my price tolerance range ymmv. This is one of those times when purchasing a new motorcycle instead of a used one would have been a wise move.

  3. #33
    Flirting With The Redline 1000 Posts! Sorg67's Avatar
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    Yes, new has its benefits. But if you average the ones that worked out well with the rest. I think you come out ahead on the whole. But the comment you made in another thread about a new rider is good. Don't want to complicate the new rider experience with a mess.

    Anyway, my son and I are having fun with this and learning along the way.

    On thing I have learned is that an old bike with low miles that looks brand new is not necessarily as new as it looks.

    Time ages bikes even when they have not had a lot of miles on them. Especially if they sit.

    Clues I could have seen on this bike if I knew what to look for.

  4. #34
    Flirting With The Redline 1000 Posts! Sorg67's Avatar
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    Thanks to all for the great and helpful suggestions. We will carry on.

  5. #35
    RiderCoach 4000 Posts! AZridered's Avatar
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    The inlet needle and seat are usually pretty easy to replace. Inlet needles develop a wear groove around the conical end of the needle and then stop sealing.

    Does the float (floats) really float? Check in a can of gasoline.

    Is the float height set appropriately. In most cases, the pivot arm that presses the needle into the seat should be parallel with the float bowl gasket surface when the needle is seated, but the needle spring is not compressed (ie. upside down with no added load).

    Stain clean-up? Simple Green, Simple Orange (as Norty noted), using a rag or old toothbrush, spray-on brake cleaner and cotton wool, If the stains are under the clear coat (assuming coated case parts) there may be no way to readily eliminate the stains.

  6. #36
    Flirting With The Redline 1000 Posts! Sorg67's Avatar
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    The bike only has 6,000 miles on it. Bought it with 1,950 miles in 2015. Would it develop wear grooves in so few miles? I am thinking that the problem is more likely sitting and amateur repair / cleaning.

  7. #37
    RiderCoach 4000 Posts! NORTY's Avatar
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    Not impossible to have erosion. Especially with use of ethanol laced gasoline. I had the same issue with the carb on my Harley. It took longer, but the jet erosion was still there. Eventually, I traded it for a fuelie.
    Knowledge speaks, wisdom listens.

  8. #38
    Flirting With The Redline 1000 Posts! Sorg67's Avatar
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    Sitting for a long time with ethanol gas in Florida heat it a highly plausible scenario. I have been running mostly non ethanol gas since I got it. It has not been ridden much for the past six months but I have been good about getting it out once a month.

  9. #39
    Flirting With The Redline 1000 Posts! Sorg67's Avatar
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    This rebuild kit says it is compatible with my year. Safe to assume all bikes my year have same carburetor? Rebuild a good idea to both address this problem and hopefully reduce risk of future problems?


    https://www.ebay.com/itm/Carburetor-...del%3ADRZ400SM

    I am going to take it off this weekend and take some pictures. Hopefully that will help. I know you guys love pictures.

  10. #40
    Flirting With The Redline 8000 Posts! Trials's Avatar
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    Based solely on the link to that carburetor "kit" Notice how the needle assembly has a black tip! That is rubberized and most likely the part that you actually require to resolve your current issue. The rest of the parts are just a collection of o-rings that 'hopefully' are the correct sizes for your carburetor, you probably only need one or two of those and the rest are very likely redundant at the moment. The brass part is the seat or fuel jet that the needle inserts into, the only reason to replace that would be if your original is physically damaged by abuse or corrosion.

    I am always skeptical of kits for motorcycle carbs, if it was for a chainsaw type carburetor a 'kit' would include all of the rubber, paper fabric and spring parts needed, including the little diaphragm type fuel pump that those things utilize. For a CV motorcycle carburetor it's the rubber o-rings and seals that wear out, dry out, shrink, crack or are damaged in handling or installation. Your carburetor is gravity fed so unlikely to use a diaphragm fuel pump :/ unless it is equipped with an accelerator pump, which sometimes is the case.


    For basic knowledge and interest only:
    Fuel injection is a closed loop pressurized fuel delivery system, carburetors all have somewhere that fuel sits in direct contact with atmospheric pressure (vented) That is a major downfall of the carburetor design, they all have somewhere inside them that fuel pools and evaporates. That evaporation leaves behind fuel born residue and in the presence of oxygen it promotes corrosion. This is about ten times more of a problem up here in the great white north where we see sub-zero temps, crazy humidity and extended periods of non-use

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