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Thread: 2018 Vstar 250 or new 2015 vstar 650

  1. #21
    Flirting With The Redline DUISparky's Avatar
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    Shadow's 100% on the exhaust. The rear cylinder "header" pipe is completely cosmetic and does absolutely nothing, other than possibly draw some hot air off the rear cylinder and run it down the open ended pipe. The actual rear header is hidden behind the cosmetic one, and the pipe runs down between the transmission and the swing arm to join with the front exhaust at the muffler, then the exhaust runs through a cat converter mounted to the inboard side of the lower (front cyl) muffler and splits out to the upper/rear cylinder muffler. Kind of weird, but I guess it works. Upgrading will be a pain.
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  2. #22
    Flirting With The Redline 2000 Posts! Sorg67's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by subvetSSN606 View Post
    A couple things of note for new riders:
    It may seem like it's screaming, but remember, the engine is between your legs, not out on the other side of a sound-proofing compartment. It's also normal for it to be running 6000RPM or so at that speed, not the 2000-3000RPM you might be used to in your car.
    Give it a little time to get used to the wind. The first time you go fast on a bike it's very noticeable, but you'll likely find after doing it several times it doesn't seem that bad and is actually part of the fun. However if it still bothers you there's nothing wrong with adding a windscreen.

    Enjoy the adventure!
    Tom
    I had this experience and was shifting too soon.

  3. #23
    Flirting With The Redline 8000 Posts! Trials's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by DUISparky View Post
    ... a cat converter ...
    curious;
    I found a reference to a resonator chamber, 2 baffles and nothing to suggest it has a cat converter, no heat shield to deal with the associated heat and no oxygen sensor, are you certain it has one? I could find no reference to one being on the 250 and never seen a cat converter without an oxygen sensor as even my competition trials bikes have an O2 sensor when the cat converter is installed

  4. #24
    Flirting With The Redline 10,000 Posts! Shadow Shack's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by subvetSSN606 View Post
    It may seem like it's screaming, but remember, the engine is between your legs, not out on the other side of a sound-proofing compartment. It's also normal for it to be running 6000RPM or so at that speed, not the 2000-3000RPM you might be used to in your car.
    This.

    While your typical car peaks around 5000RPM, that 250 of yours peaks a little north of 9K.

    Many people fall into the sprocket swap theory, fully believing that their bike should behave just like their car: "loafing" at lower RPMs at freeway speeds. But here's the reality: while your car probably churns around 2K or so at 60mph your bike is easily doing 4000 or so because, well...as I illustrated at the start the bike is basically doubling the car's RPM at any given speed. In other words, your bike really is behaving just like your car: it's revving at about half the maximum at 60mph. It's simply revving on a different scale, your car is a bass while your bike is a soprano --- they're both hitting the exact same note but one is higher pitched than the other.
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  5. #25
    Flirting With The Redline 10,000 Posts! Shadow Shack's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Captain J View Post
    local bikers love to laugh at the baby bikes
    There's an easy solution to this: once you've gained some riding mastery you simply make your 250 grow up:




    ...or in your case:

    Sent from your mom's phone
    "If I wanted a windshield and tunes, I'd drive my car."
    Ride Safe, Chop Safer
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  6. #26
    Flirting With The Redline 2000 Posts! Sorg67's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Shadow Shack View Post
    But here's the reality: while your car probably churns around 2K or so at 60mph your bike is easily doing 4000 or so because, well...as I illustrated at the start the bike is basically doubling the car's RPM at any given speed.
    I read or heard someplace that an efficient target cruising RPM for a motorcycle is about 50% of redline. I have been applying this to my Versys. It redlines at 10,500 so I try to keep it about 5,000 RPMs. It is a six speed, in fourth gear, 5,000 rpms is about 50 mph. So when I am cruising at 50 mph, I am usually in 4th gear whereas when I got the bike, I would have been in 6th gear at 50 mph and closer to 3,000 rpms.

    I find another benefit of this practice is that the power band is between 5,000 rpms and 8,500 rpms on this bike. This means that if I am cruising at 5,000 rpms, I do not need to downshift for power. I just have to twist the throttle. For normal riding, I tend to shift around 6,000 rpms. Each shift point seems to equate to about a 1,000 rpm drop.

    I have found a downside to this practice is that my fuel economy is not as good.

    Am I understanding and applying this dynamic appropriately?

    Is it common for the power band to begin around half of redline? Or is that more variable?

  7. #27
    Flirting With The Redline DUISparky's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Trials View Post
    curious;
    I found a reference to a resonator chamber, 2 baffles and nothing to suggest it has a cat converter, no heat shield to deal with the associated heat and no oxygen sensor, are you certain it has one? I could find no reference to one being on the 250 and never seen a cat converter without an oxygen sensor as even my competition trials bikes have an O2 sensor when the cat converter is installed
    Yeah, cat converter, reso chamber, echo chamber, cone of silence, whatever. Haven't looked at parts lists or spec sheets on it in about 2 years. Or cared much. I just remember there's a big hunk of metal welded to the cans that looks kinda like the cat converter on my old Subaru Brat. Sue me for using the wrong terminology. Main point being that upgrading the exhaust isn't a simple replacement of the slip ons like on a VS650 or VS1100.
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  8. #28
    Flirting With The Redline 8000 Posts! Trials's Avatar
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    where does my motorcycle perform best

    If in doubt refer to the dyno chart



    I would put the cruising speed of the 250 v-star at ~6500 rpm
    performance of some motors falls off very quickly on approaching max rpm'
    V-star has a bore and stroke of 49mm x 66mm which is under square so performance will tend to be fairly broad in the power range and happen at relatively lower rpm in comparison to a square or oversquare motor

    Notice on the chart how the horsepower and torque output actually depreciates above 8,500
    If you have more gears and the wind resistance still has not killed your forward motion, that would be a good point to consider up-shifting.

  9. #29
    Flirting With The Redline 8000 Posts! Trials's Avatar
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    I think you might find it has no catalytic converter which would need to be located directly in the path of hot exhaust gasses or it simply wouldn't work. Catalytic converter is a emissions control device that by federal law you are not allowed to tamper with, they contain materials such as Platinum which significantly increases the cost of the motorcycle.
    ... & if it did have a catalytic converter that part would (by law) have the longest warranty coverage of any part on the vehicle.

  10. #30
    RiderCoach 8000 Posts! WoodstockJeff's Avatar
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    "Efficiency cruise" is usually at the torque peak of the motor. That's the point where the engine turns the least amount of gas into the most amount of power. Works for cars, motorcycles, whatever.
    Jeff

    "The future is so much easier to predict when you have a handle on how you arrived at now.... Works with traffic just as well as the rest of life. "

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