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Thread: Favorite/safe roads

  1. #41
    Quote Originally Posted by Mad Matt View Post
    Maybe I'm misunderstanding you, or maybe I'm just a coward, but my skin crawls at the thought of having only 20% of traction in reserve. Too many potential "gotchas" that can't be seen until you're on top of them - frost heaves and dips, gravel, animals, blind intersections, etc.
    In my defense all I can say is in 43 years of riding I've been down on the street once ... happened at night mid corner due to copious amounts of gravel ... which had not been there 2 days before(it's near my home). I literally saw it a split second before I hit it. Scraped turn signal lens/scraped knee ... picked her up and rode on. My own analysis. Complacency on my part ...

    OTOH... mountain hang glider pilot ... fall line snowboarder ... aerobatic pilot ... surfer ... even my occupation specialty had serious death rates. I don't think I'm fool hardy ... but I can't claim to be risk adverse either. I am very calculating in my risk taking though ...

    I've experienced a Winnebago coming the other way fully in my lane on a 2 lane mountain road in Colorado and a Harley in the middle of my lane in Texas Hill Country. Both the driver and the rider had the full on deer in the headlights look ... and I was 2-up and loaded for touring. Rather than feeling panicked ... I felt dead calm ... and instantly calculated my best option was to take my bike to the fog line and hope. Flicked right ... held just outside the line ... steered back when they were past. My analysis is if I had spent all my riding at 50% ... I would not have been able to pull that off.

    I need to add ... I credit good fortune or whatever you want to call it to the outcomes of those two incidents. I would not want to try them 10 times by any means ...
    The best thing you can buy for your motorcycle is gas.

  2. #42
    Flirting With The Redline 8000 Posts! Trials's Avatar
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    No worries I'll ride with you Matt; I figure I use at most about 15 to 20% of my bikes potential on the street and if I used much more I would lose my license to a road racing charge or some kind of astronomical speeding ticket.

  3. #43
    Flirting With The Redline Mad Matt's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Trials View Post
    No worries I'll ride with you Matt
    No worries, huh? The first time I went riding with you I tumbled your Montesa down a hill and nearly broke my neck. And I still have scars from side-swiping a cedar tree at Woody's event that you invited me to last spring. "No worries" is not what comes to mind when I think of riding with you!

    Sounds like fun; I'm in.

  4. #44
    Flirting With The Redline 1000 Posts! liberpolly's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by OBX-RIDER View Post
    Just between me ... and the voice in my head ... when I apply brakes mid-corner ... an error light illuminates ... But this is in my head and my error light ... YMMV.

    There is that very commonly used example of a circle or pie that represents the total traction available from a tire. Now this assumes a certain amount of what economists call ceteris paribus, or other factors remain constant. I'm sure everyone has heard/seen this example of the pie.

    As I said the pie represent 100% of the traction available. We can use all of the pie for braking ... or all off it for cornering ... or we can divide it up ... up to 100%. But if we are using 85% for cornering and ask for 16% for braking ... we are probably going to go down ... (Frankly riders like Marquez, Rossi, Dovi and the like can probably assess the pie to within 2 or 3% ... and even they occasionally go to 101% and crash ... )

    ... and for me the further I get away from my last trackday, the more I feel I am less accurate at assessing what around 100% is (and I am certainly not claiming absolute accuracy ... on my best day) so I error on the side of caution. My goal on the street is never to exceed 80%. (I was in error saying I ride at 80% ... I ride to stay within 80% ... )

    For me ... a well ridden street corner is one I (1)enter at a speed that allows some room for error/surprises (2) maintain a constant arc/lean angle from entry to exit (3) maintain a steady if slight increase in throttle (3) Look deeply through the turn through-out (4) at no time does any part of my bike/body part cross the yellow center line (5) and I end by smoothly bringing the bike up following with my body.( I do not hang-off street riding but I do "weight" the inside of the saddle and move my upper body so my head is about over the inside mirror.)

    And mebbe bonus points if I calmly and accurately alter my line if I encounter obstacles like dirt, large rock, gravel etc. mid corner.

    I'm not saying this is the "right" way to do it ... it's just the way I do it ... YMMV.
    What about prancing steaks?
    "The better you're prepared, the luckier you get".

  5. #45
    Flirting With The Redline 1000 Posts! liberpolly's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by AZridered View Post
    When you begin braking in a corner, something has to change. Added work (braking) being done by the tires means that there must be traction and ground clearance in reserve. If not, you start to slide. Reducing speed while holding the same line means that lean angle will increase. To stay on line, added steering is needed to manage lean angle. Again, traction reserve is needed.
    Of course.

    Quote Originally Posted by AZridered View Post
    Also consider: If you cannot stop within the distance you can see, you are riding too fast.
    No doubt.

    "The better you're prepared, the luckier you get".

  6. #46
    Flirting With The Redline 8000 Posts! Trials's Avatar
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    Good man! haven't been using my BMW enough lately so I been thinking about turning it into one of these next year:
    can I sign you up to ride monkey



    what could possibly go wrong!

  7. #47
    Quote Originally Posted by AZridered View Post

    Also consider: If you cannot stop within the distance you can see, you are riding too fast.
    I'm wondering if this is an AZ thing because of all your wide open spaces. Missy had problems adapting to our tree lined roads when she was out East on a ride some years ago. Even worse are many of our mountain roads ... some on the Blue Ridge Pkwy come to mind ... where if you rode a sight distance pace ... you would be going walking slow.

    There is something that kicks in that I believe is instinctual when faced with limited sight distance. I really noticed it at a small hill on VIR race track. The track just disappears and I struggled not to go "off throttle" approaching it ... until I noticed the corner worker stationed at that hill. Now I keep accelerating while watching that worker in my periphery.

    On the blind turns in the mountains ... I take a calculated risk (no corner worker)and visualize through the turn that I cannot see through. What's hurting and killing riders in the mountains is ... motorcyclists exceeding their lane and/or running off the road ... usually on the brakes. The most likely problem I've encountered in blind turns is bicyclists riding 3 and 4 abreast going the same way ... but very slowly. (Old people driving Winnebagos keep weeding them out but more keep coming.) It's the only place where I think a louder than stock pipe is a good idea ...

    Quote Originally Posted by liberpolly View Post
    What about prancing steaks?
    Well err um yes. The problem of course is their unpredictability which is part of their instincts. My number 1 tool is to slow down and remain watchful. But for me this is two part ... bike comes up a bit/brake goes on ... kinda reverse trail braking. I believe deer jink (unpredictably) because their old predator, the wolf, is faster in the short distance. So the slower I'm going ... the more likely I think the deer will just try to outrun me .. w/o jinks.

    But better riders than me have been brought down by deer so I am respectful of the risk ... especially during the rut.
    The best thing you can buy for your motorcycle is gas.

  8. #48
    Flirting With The Redline Mad Matt's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Trials View Post
    Good man! haven't been using my BMW enough lately so I been thinking about turning it into one of these next year:
    can I sign you up to ride monkey



    what could possibly go wrong!
    Where can I get a helmet with a wheel on the side?

  9. #49
    Neil's (noshoes) Kawi H2 triple 2stroke motocross sidecar bike ... It allegedly had issues which eliminated all but the insane to 'ride' monkey ... no one ever did it twice ...

    01_28_2-L by mmelugin48, on Flickr
    The best thing you can buy for your motorcycle is gas.

  10. #50
    RiderCoach 4000 Posts! AZridered's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by OBX-RIDER View Post
    I'm wondering if this is an AZ thing because of all your wide open spaces.
    Possibly some. We do have mountain and canyon roads and I think that being cautious of sight distance, for me, has more to do with rocks, tourists in motorhomes, elk, and deer. There was the time on the way to Prescott that we came around a tight turn to find a bull sunning himself in the road (open range area).

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