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Thread: Swiss Army Knife

  1. #11
    Flirting With The Redline 2000 Posts! Sorg67's Avatar
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    Yes, I could see the G650GS as a contender. For me, if there is any gravel road or off road, the bike would have to be very light as I do not have a lot of experience on loose terrain. Right now that would limit me to dual sport bikes like my DRZ400S and KLX 250S. Not great choice (okay a terrible choice) for any distance, but it can be done and they are great for bopping around town.

    If you eliminate loose terrain, then Versys 650 would become a contender in my book.

    Although none of those are much in the looks department. Then again any motorcycle has a certain level of cool.

  2. #12
    Flirting With The Redline 3000 Posts! Galaxieman's Avatar
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    The KLR 650 is the Swiss Army knife of motorcycles. The burgman is a spork.

    /troll

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    ... and all that promise of power just sorta evaporated into the clattery, hoary sound of disappointment.

  3. #13
    I can’t speak for a Burgman as I don’t own, and have never ridden one, but if I compare my scoot to your dual-sport, I come out on top in review scores.

    Kymco Downtown 300i - Editor’s score - 79% (C+/B-)
    KLCR 650 - Editor’s score - 76.5% (C/C+)


    http://www.motorcycle.com/manufactur...0i-review.html

    http://www.motorcycle.com/manufactur...ki/klr650.html

    The KLCR can go off road, but I’d wager off the dealer room floor, without adding accessories - top cases, panniers, tank bags, etc. ... I could load up a cargo bag on the back seat of my bike for a five day trip. Additionally, I also have room for a tool kit under my seat with room for my helmet, heavy security locking chain, extra bungie cords, and food. I could charge my cell phone in the glove compartment, or recharge my helmet cam for motovloging, or even power the camera if I have it mounted on my handle bars, or windshield and have it connected to the outlet in the glove compartment for hours worth of footage (depending on the size of my SD card).

    I can store my wallet, sunglasses, or a map in the glove compartment as well.

    I can park on the side stand, or center stand giving my bike extra protection and safety for numerous parking situations and terrains.

    Off the dealer room floor I could do a full weeks worth of food shopping by storing bags under the seat and on the shopping hook in the open space in the front, I could go Christmas shopping, or even get a small Christmas tree. I can ride in city traffic, on the highway, and back twisty roads.

    The KLR650’s gas tank is impressive at 6 gallons, but at 38 mpg it can only go about 228 miles. My tank is 3.3 gallons, but with a 66 mpg rate, it has a rang of 218 miles. You can go 10 miles more, but paying twice the amount of gas.

    Price - 2016 KLR650 - MSRP $6,899
    Price - 2016 Kymco Downtown 300i - MSRP - $5,599.00

    You’re paying more, but not getting as much in return. If you want to add accessories, and that’s the fun part of a dual-sport, that’s cool, but that’s also more money. So, if you want to say it’s a swiss army knife, then why does it need added stuff?

    - Wolf

  4. #14
    Flirting With The Redline 2000 Posts! Sorg67's Avatar
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    My sense of the concept of the Swiss Army knife of motorcycles is a bike that can do anything. If you include off road then scooters would have to be excluded from consideration.

    I have only ridden a scooter a few times and only small (150cc) versions. But I would imagine that a larger one would do many things very well. They might be excellent bikes for the majority of what most riders do, myself included.

    But for consideration as a Swiss Army knife of motorcycles, it would seem that you would be in the dual sport or adventure class. These bikes are not optimal for anything but can do everything.

    I have looked at an Alaska back country ride. They go from highways to gravel roads to muddy trails to crossing streams. The tour company I looked at uses KLR650s for these rides. A KLR650 could also serve as an around the town commuter or a long distance touring bike. It would not work as well as a scooter for touring and commuting. But I think a KLR650 could manage commuting and touring better than a scooter could manage a muddy road or rocky stream crossing.

    I think scooters are probably excellent choices for the riding most people do most of the time. But I would not consider them to be a Swiss Army candidate if it cannot do everything.

  5. #15
    Flirting With The Redline 8000 Posts! Trials's Avatar
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    Complete versatility is a pickup truck full of dirt bikes ride anywhere anytime in any weather and take all the gear plus provisions you could possibly require.

  6. #16
    Quote Originally Posted by Sorg67 View Post
    My sense of the concept of the Swiss Army knife of motorcycles is a bike that can do anything. If you include off road then scooters would have to be excluded from consideration.

    I have only ridden a scooter a few times and only small (150cc) versions. But I would imagine that a larger one would do many things very well. They might be excellent bikes for the majority of what most riders do, myself included.

    But for consideration as a Swiss Army knife of motorcycles, it would seem that you would be in the dual sport or adventure class. These bikes are not optimal for anything but can do everything.

    I have looked at an Alaska back country ride. They go from highways to gravel roads to muddy trails to crossing streams. The tour company I looked at uses KLR650s for these rides. A KLR650 could also serve as an around the town commuter or a long distance touring bike. It would not work as well as a scooter for touring and commuting. But I think a KLR650 could manage commuting and touring better than a scooter could manage a muddy road or rocky stream crossing.

    I think scooters are probably excellent choices for the riding most people do most of the time. But I would not consider them to be a Swiss Army candidate if it cannot do everything.

    I would disagree. Scooters are designed for commuting and touring, and could it far better than a KLR650. I could never transport what I need for teaching a class, doing demonstrations, or filming (transporting camera, sound equipment, tripods, etc. ... ) as conveniently on a MC as I could on my scooter. Some can (scooters), and have gone off road, and those that aren't designed for it still perform the task.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UNAUpmIHow8
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9GPvwbUaxug


    They're designed to be versatile. Going off road is one facet of 2-wheel riding, but it's not an everyday need, but a specific purpose. That's why off road bikes are made. Scooters run the full gauntlet of sizes and types from 50cc to sports classes (150-250cc) to touring (300-800cc). There are scooter racing leagues of a number of classes, and a maxi-scooter rider just came in 55th place for 11 day, 11,000 mile Iron Butt Rally on a 2008 Burgman 400.

    http://ibr.wvi.com/ibr/_2017/finalstandings.pdf

    Given the task of things I need to do, or places to go in a day, I go to my bike because it's a good alternative to a car. Commuting, transporting items, shopping, traveling, camping. I've nothing against a dual-sport. If I were to get a motorcycle, I'd get one, or a café racer, but I get more for my money with my current bike. You said a dual sport can do anything. It can't until you add more things to it like a top case, pannier, or a tank bag for carrying essentials like tools, repair kits, first aid kit, food, water, clothes, to secure a helmet, maps. and more. It's a great foundation to build on, but as I said before, off a dealer room floor a lot of scooters can do many, if not all of those things with no additions needed.

    - Wolf

  7. #17
    Flirting With The Redline 2000 Posts! Sorg67's Avatar
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    True that dual sport bike require adding luggage to be suitable for commuting and touring and even with the luggage, would not be as good at those functions as scooters.

    I agree that scooters are very practical choices for everything except going off road. I guess it comes down to how you define swiss army knife of bikes:

    1. Does it have to be strictly stock?
    2. Does it have to be off road capable?

    I say no, it does not have to be stock and yes it has to be off road capable those two opinions would take me to adventure and dual sport bikes. But defining swiss army knife bikes is open to interpretation. And I certainly agree that for those who do not need to go off road, scooters make a lot of sense.

  8. #18
    I would agree. It could be easy to get lost in the vagueness of rhetoric and the use and application of metaphor, swiss army knife in this case. The result would be a swirling round about of points and counter points. That wasn't want I wanted from this thread. What really matters is if a rider is satisfied with their bike.

    Swiss army knife, bayonet, leatherman or guide missile. If a bike meets our needs that's how we'll visualize it.

    - Wolf

  9. #19
    Flirting With The Redline 4000 Posts! taylorcraft07's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Galaxieman View Post
    The KLR 650 is the Swiss Army knife of motorcycles. The burgman is a spork.

    /troll
    Sporks are good. I like to eat.

    Dave

  10. #20
    Flirting With The Redline 2000 Posts! Sorg67's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by scooterwolf View Post
    Swiss army knife, bayonet, leatherman or guide missile. If a bike meets our needs that's how we'll visualize it.
    I have never considered a scooter for myself. Functionally, I would have to admit that it would out perform all the bikes I own for the vast majority of the riding I do - mostly short trips around town. My Versys 650 with the 47 liter top case would be close.

    But I do not ride for functionality. If I was driven by function, I would be driving a Toyota Prius plug-in hybrid or something of that ilk. I ride because it makes me smile. And the smile factor is completely subjective.

    How would a scooter stand up in the smile factor for me? I think anything with two wheels would make me smile. I still enjoy riding my bicycle.

    What motorcycle could best do all the riding I have done to date? DRZ400S with the top case.

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