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Thread: Swiss Army Knife

  1. #21
    My scoot always makes me smile, whether I'm riding 2-up with my wife going 30-40 mph, or hitting the highways at 75-80, passing semi-trucks and SUVs. I also love the footage I can get on my bike by placing my camera at different angles. With more flat panels I can mount my cam in numerous spots that may not be possible with a MC.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=CsRRlzg5clk

    - Wolf

  2. #22
    Flirting With The Redline 3000 Posts! Galaxieman's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by taylorcraft07 View Post
    Sporks are good. I like to eat.

    Dave
    Somebody gets it... obvious troll was apparently not obvious enough.


    As for the overall discussion: Swiss-Army knife implies "multiple use tool, with capacity for doing most, if not all, things". I'm not knocking the scooter as a great option for commuting, and will stipulate that off the showroom floor, a scooter has much better storage options than most other motorcycles. But as it regards being even moderately capable offroad, scooters fall flat on their face. Can they both be trounced at the track by a Ninjette? Yes, but they can still both go around the track. Anything beyond well-kept fire roads is asking for serious trouble with a scooter, for a number of reasons (suspension travel and tire size to name a few). Can a KLR do trials work? Not well, but at least you'd have a shot.

    Commuting as the main role for the bike? I'd pick Wolf's scooter over a KLR (and my Concours 14 with a topcase over either)

    "I'm going to have you do something on a bike, somewhere in the world, but you have to pick a bike first" - diesel KLR. Just sayin.

    ETA: I love scooters. My dad's aunt & uncle had an old Honda Spree that we blazed around their neighborhood on when we visited. Classic Vespas are very cool. And the new gen maxi-scoots are quite capable. But as it regards the 'does everything' implied by calling something a SAK, I gotta pick the KLR.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Afflo
    ... and all that promise of power just sorta evaporated into the clattery, hoary sound of disappointment.

  3. #23
    Flirting With The Redline Mad Matt's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Galaxieman View Post
    Can a KLR do trials work? Not well, but at least you'd have a shot.
    Somebody actually did ride a KLR at a trials event I went to last spring. I think he bailed out after the first loop, but A+ for effort.

  4. #24
    A lot of Ruckus riders do off road riding, but nothing compared to a dirt bike. For me, if I look at what I'd need a bike for over a year - travel, commuting, transporting, comfort, convenience, dependability and affordability, I'd still pick a scooter. If it were a zombie apocalypse, (or Trump really loses his shit, and the Atlt-right fully takes over ), and I need to head for the high country to survive,
    I'd go with a dual-sport, hand down.

    Just curious though, how well does a dual sport run fully loaded off road?

    - Wolf

  5. #25
    Contributor 2000 Posts! Diane_N's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Galaxieman View Post
    The KLR 650 is the Swiss Army knife of motorcycles. The burgman is a spork.

    /troll
    Not sure exactly what you mean by that. I've had a Burgman since 2004. So far, two 400's and two 650's (and hubby had a 650 which was recently traded for my R3)
    The big Burgman is a very versatile beast. The cargo trunk under the seat can fit up to four bags of groceries. When I take it to work, (which is often), I can throw my helmet, boots and jacket under the seat, lock it up and off to the office. I rode it to Bug Bash with the Northeast crew (once!). I only need to add a tail bag or saddle bags if taking a longer trip. Even then, I've ridden it down to Long Island where I grew up, from Albany NY where I currently live, with everything I needed stowed under the seat. In stop and go traffic, it's great not having to be constantly needing to ride the clutch - no hand cramps! Still, I have seldom had the Scooter as my only two-wheeler, though the last two years, it has been, and if I had to choose having only one motorcycle, I'd pick the Scooter. I've only recently acquired a small "shifty thing", which is more fun to flick around than the "Lardy" Burgman.
    eta: No, I would not recommend dirt riding with the maxi scooter. So, the "Spork" comparison is probably more apt.
    Last edited by Diane_N; 07-16-2017 at 06:46 PM. Reason: additional comment
    http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v11/bikinbiddy/dsc01293-1.jpg

  6. #26
    Flirting With The Redline 3000 Posts! Galaxieman's Avatar
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    Oh, I love the hell outta some sporks. KFC FTW! The /troll tag at the end was an attempt to note that I was basically just being contrary for its own sake. But as a comparison to the 'does most everything' SAK utensil scooters do come off a bit soft. You and Wolf are totally on-point about the maxi-scooter class coming with expansive levels of cartage at a much lower price point than say a Goldwing. But for the same money as the Kymco, one could pick up a Ninja 300 and a Givi topcase. Of course that also comes with the necessity to deal with a clutch in traffic, another spot where the CVT-equipped scooters excel.

    Everybody has their preferences, and where Wolf appears to have a bias toward comfort and carrying capacity, I have a predisposition to be on the SPORT end of Sport-Touring. Which is why I bought a bike with a motor basically stolen from the ZX-14 - I'm a hooligan at heart.

    As for how a dual-sport goes fully loaded: see Long Way Round, or Long Way Down with Ewan McGregor and Charlie Boorman. They were both on big GS bikes, and noted that they would have been better on lighter KTMs, but BMW provided the rides, so that's who they went with. Once they got the hang of it, they did pretty well offroad. They were following 'roads', but in some places, that term is use very, very loosely (see: Mongolia).

    __________________
    Quote Originally Posted by Afflo
    ... and all that promise of power just sorta evaporated into the clattery, hoary sound of disappointment.

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