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Thread: Parking tall bike on very sloped street?

  1. #1

    Parking tall bike on very sloped street?

    Help and suggestions needed!

    I need to visit a family member who lives on a street that is very sloped for drainage, and I'm not too sure how to park my big bike safely.

    What I mean is that the center of the street is high, and the street then slopes downward to the gutter and curb. I will have to park a V-Strom on the street and I'm concerned about it falling, or conversely, being leaned over so far that I can't get it off the sidestand.

    I searched the forum but didn't see anything directly discussing this. Thanks!
    steph moore | New Mexico, USA
    2009 V-Strom 650 ABS (for now....)

  2. #2
    RiderCoach 5000 Posts!
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    It's going to be hard to describe but...

    Rear end downhill, against the curb is possible.
    At an angle so that there is some lean over onto the side stand but not so much you can't raise the bike upright. (If you park the bike straight along the curb, you're going to have the side stand on the uphill side of the bike.)
    Obviously front wheel turned towards side stand side.
    And leave it in gear so it won't roll away on you.

    And if it's a hot environment (assuming still in NM), I recommend putting something (crushed can, puck, etc) under the side stand so that the weight of the bike doesn't make it sink into the asphalt and risk a fall over.

    Hopefully that makes sense and helps.

  3. #3
    Miles of smiles We've stopped counting... asp125's Avatar
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    You kind of have to experiment with the angle from the curb. What you are describing is a very crowned road, high in the middle and steeply sloping towards the gutter. Rear wheel downhill for sure. Sometimes the crown is so sloped that if you are closer to parallel with the curb, the sidestand hits the uphill part of the crown; you might not get enough lean. In that case park more perpendicular to the curb. If that still won't give you enough lean for stability, go as far as 90* but no more, from the curb. More than that however and you're back to leaning the bike downhill, if you can envision it. A good start is 45*, giving you an idea of which way you need to go.

    Rule of thumb, the steeper the crown, the more perpendicular to the curb you need to park.
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  4. #4
    Sounds like this is a cambered road. My hairdresser lives on such a road. When I go for my appointments, I am very careful when I park. Granted, my bike is only about an inch or so shorter than the Strom, so it's not a 1:1 comparison. Also, the angles of my hairdresser's street and your family member's street may vary. In short, take this with a grain of salt.

    I definitely still park with my rear wheel against the curb. The only thing I do to increase the lean toward the side stand is park either exactly perpendicular to the curb, or I angle the bike a bit to face my left. I usually keep it perpendicular to ensure the fork reflectors are still seen if the sun goes down. In this position, yes. The bike totally feels like it is standing almost straight up. I put the bike on the stand, test the stability, and slide off slowly. I check the stability even after I'm off. It's just fine. Getting back on is different, but not bad. I have had no issues mounting, or getting it back off the side side. It's different, but not bad. Again, the bikes and streets differ, so YMMV. I'd file this under "something to consider, but not overly worry about."
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  5. #5
    Flirting With The Redline 2000 Posts! Kootenanny's Avatar
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    I live near a town with a lot of steep hills. Like asp says, experiment a bit with the angles--if you're not happy, just move the bike a bit (you can do this standing beside the bike--easier than from the seat--I wouldn't say this, but I've ridden with guys who seem incapable of moving their bike unless they're sitting on it).

    Be very careful of parking with the stand on a rising slope (standing the bike straight up). Guy I know had his bike fall over from a very light breeze standing like that. And I dropped a bike once while getting aboard, it fell away from me and I couldn't stop it.

    Oh, and someone above mentioned leaving it in gear. This is another thing I wouldn't normally mention, because we ALL leave our bikes in gear when parked, right? No matter where!

  6. #6
    RiderCoach 10,000 Posts! SoCal LabRat's Avatar
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    The good thing is by parking perpendicular to the curb, you use gravity to get there. When you reach your parking spot, turn the bars to the left and pull into the lane a bit more and stop, the turn the bars to the right and start backing up feathering the front brake to control your speed. Straighten the bars as needed and slowly bring the rear tire to rest at the curb. Voila!
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  7. #7
    RiderCoach 5000 Posts! NORTY's Avatar
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    Does the V-Strom have a centerstand?
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  8. #8
    RiderCoach 5000 Posts! NORTY's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Kootenanny View Post

    Oh, and someone above mentioned leaving it in gear. This is another thing I wouldn't normally mention, because we ALL leave our bikes in gear when parked, right? No matter where!
    [Nortysmind] Must make mental note to start leaving motorcycles "in gear" when parking.[/Nortysmind]
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  9. #9
    Contributor We've stopped counting... Bugguts's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by NORTY View Post
    [Nortysmind] Must make mental note to start leaving motorcycles "in gear" when parking.[/Nortysmind]
    Ditto on this.
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  10. #10
    Flirting With The Redline 2000 Posts! Kootenanny's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by NORTY View Post
    [Nortysmind] Must make mental note to start leaving motorcycles "in gear" when parking.[/Nortysmind]
    [Kootsmind]What possible reason could he have for NOT parking it in gear?--Oh, unless he's one of those snooty types with a centrestand...[/Kootsmind]

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