Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 17

Thread: 1700cc First Bike. Lets Party.

  1. #1

    1700cc First Bike. Lets Party.

    Before the collective groans rush across the net and drown me in aggressive disapproval, i'd just like to clear up you're probably justified. However, after a few test rides on my lovely 2011 Victory Vegas Jackpot, i've found it is not nearly as ridiculous as I thought.

    I'm a 5'9 165 lbs guy who learned to ride early on my fathers 1100cc Honda Shadow Spirit. Originally I wasn't going to get the Victory, but I got it for a very good deal compared to a shadow 750 that was even more expensive and half the bike.

    My intent in humbly petitioning the biker gods is not necessarily chastisement for my decisions so far, but rather controls I can set in place so that I don't slaughter myself on my beautiful death machine. I've relegated at least and hour or two to open lot practice a day, and don't plan on touching the road for at least a month.

    What do I need to expect from this beast? The weight isn't an issue, however i'm of the understanding the torque can throw the back end out if I open it up in a corner. Advice on not killing myself gents?

  2. #2
    Flirting With The Redline 3000 Posts! Galaxieman's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Location
    Vacaville, CA
    Posts
    3,145
    Okay... so what now? First, welcome to the site. Second, have you taken the MSF basic course? If so, do you have plans to take another course on this new freight train? Progressive expansion of your riding envelope is key, and with your plan for lots of PLP before touching the street is going in the right direction. Lots of people will tell you this, but it's worth overstating: Ride your own ride. Getting an individual mentor who can ride around with you and see what you're doing might be a good idea, but I'd recommend avoiding groups that aren't very specifically beginner-oriented for a while.

    __________________
    Quote Originally Posted by Afflo
    ... and all that promise of power just sorta evaporated into the clattery, hoary sound of disappointment.

  3. #3
    Flirting With The Redline 8000 Posts! Trials's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2011
    Location
    Ontario
    Posts
    8,669
    Quote Originally Posted by Serenade View Post
    Before the collective groans rush across the net and drown me in aggressive disapproval, i'd just like to clear up you're probably justified. However, after a few test rides on my lovely 2011 Victory Vegas Jackpot, i've found it is not nearly as ridiculous as I thought.

    I'm a 5'9 165 lbs guy who learned to ride early on my fathers 1100cc Honda Shadow Spirit. Originally I wasn't going to get the Victory, but I got it for a very good deal compared to a shadow 750 that was even more expensive and half the bike.

    My intent in humbly petitioning the biker gods is not necessarily chastisement for my decisions so far, but rather controls I can set in place so that I don't slaughter myself on my beautiful death machine. I've relegated at least and hour or two to open lot practice a day, and don't plan on touching the road for at least a month.

    What do I need to expect from this beast? The weight isn't an issue, however i'm of the understanding the torque can throw the back end out if I open it up in a corner. Advice on not killing myself gents?
    Buy yourself a BS little dirt only bike, take it out on a field or desert or whatever you have near you and learn to ride. Riding a street anything after that will seem easy. ... just be aware up front that some crashes Will be involved.

  4. #4
    Flirting With The Redline 8000 Posts! Trials's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2011
    Location
    Ontario
    Posts
    8,669
    Quote Originally Posted by Serenade View Post
    ... 2011 Victory Vegas Jackpot
    ...The weight isn't an issue...
    Read, read, read, dry weight 652 pounds

    Yes weight will be an issue!

  5. #5
    Miles of smiles We've stopped counting... asp125's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Location
    West siiide
    Posts
    28,335
    Blog Entries
    1
    Well.. at least it's not a 600cc supersport. Though with that cruiser layout you'll be doing large figure-8's in the parking lot. :/

    I second Trial's suggestion, get a cheap throwaway bike and practice the basics. You'd rather drop that than scratch up a Victory, especially knowing that Polaris has killed off the marque. When you're done, sell the cheapie bike and you're out a couple hundred dollars at most.
    When life throws you curves, aim for the apex
    [sigpic][/sigpic]
    08 Spyder RS SM5 "big Bird" \ 12 S'TtripleR "stripper" \ 02 VFR800 "big red" \ 09 KLX250-S
    Sold: 97 Ninja 500R / 03 SV650N / 01 Ducati 750SS / 73 CB350-Four / 03 BMWF650GS / 08 Gixxer600 / 09 KLX250S "Gumby" / 06 Thruxton "crumpet" / 91 VFR750 /03 Gixxer6 the bass boat
    my Facebook, SpeedShotsPhotography
    MITGC #22

    "I have seen fat kids on Segways go through corners faster."

  6. #6
    Rollin' On
    Join Date
    Jan 2017
    Location
    Des Moines, IA
    Posts
    43
    I am not a skilled rider but I have read and studied a lot about this sport. The idea of buying a second cheap bike is a good one. Take the BRC or if you have done that already find an advanced rider course - even better. You may also want to think about finding a BRC trainer and see if you can pay them for a couple of days of private lessons. That would be worth the cost.

  7. #7
    Flirting With The Redline 8000 Posts! Trials's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2011
    Location
    Ontario
    Posts
    8,669

    Thumbs up

    Riding dirtbikes in amateur entry level competition is also a great way to develop your skills and meet up with people who can teach you tons. Probably a lot cheaper then private lessons. If you don't have your own land or free ride area nearby to ride on it's a great way to gain access to a riding area. Strictly dirt bikes and competition only bikes have the advantage of not requiring road plates and insurance. The bikes are less than half if not closer to one quarter the weight of the bike you just bought, there is little to nothing on them to break when you do fall down and if you never ride one, you'll have to just take my word on the fact that experience crashing motorcycles really is a good thing to be good at. Crashing on the street should be avoided at all cost. In a perfect world you will Never drop or crash your Victory, dirt riding experience will get you well on your way towards that goal.

    Your learning curve is directly proportional to the weight of your motorcycle. Trying to learn to ride really good on a 1700cc motorcycle approaching 700 pounds is about as steep and long a curve as you could possibly have. Basically; if that is the only bike you ever ride you will be an amateur for the rest of your life. By comparison, if I was going to teach you to ride, your first ride would be on a 160 pound 250cc motorcycle believe it or not they really do build them that light and even a few pounds lighter if you buy a 2-stroke. Most of the time it's even painless when they fall on you. Drop your Victory in the wrong place and you are not only sure to have damage, you might be looking for somebody to help you pick it up.

    Iowa's kinda flat what could possibly go wrong

  8. #8
    RiderCoach 4000 Posts! AZridered's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2007
    Location
    Chandler, Arizona
    Posts
    4,621
    Look for a BRC II course. This is MSF's one-step-up from the basic course. The BRC II has little (or maybe no) classroom time. In the BRC II, you ride your own motorcycle. If you are already riding about, you probably have a foundation in the basic operational skills you would learn in the Basic RiderCourse. Time may be better spent in BRC II. Maybe more than once? If you can find a location conducting the updated version of BRC II ( BRC2u) the classroom time is very well spent because it focuses on you, the rider, the place were most errors begin.

    MSF's online basic eCourse ($20) would be a good idea too. If you live in an area where the updated BRC (BRCu) is offered, the eCourse is probably included when you sign up.

  9. #9
    Flirting With The Redline 2000 Posts! AlwaysLearnin's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2013
    Location
    NE PA
    Posts
    2,167
    Blog Entries
    4
    Quote Originally Posted by Trials View Post
    ...
    Your learning curve is directly proportional to the weight of your motorcycle. Trying to learn to ride really good on a 1700cc motorcycle approaching 700 pounds is about as steep and long a curve as you could possibly have. ...
    Speaking as a 3 year rider who started on and still rides a HD Road King, I concur. But it does get easier with time in the saddle. However that 700 lb. weight is always there, in the feel of the bike and tends to make you less willing to see how far you can lean it over in a turn for fear it's going to fall over (it usually won't) and how slow you can really do low speed maneuvers (pretty slow) and whether or not you'll be able to pick it up if it does fall over (you will - just make sure you do it the correct way) and whether you can afford to fix what breaks when it does hit the ground (hmmmm.. that one's questionable). There's just something about riding a big, heavy, EXPENSIVE bike that makes you overly concious of dropping it and making it not so pretty.

    Sent from my SM-G930V using Tapatalk
    Quote Originally Posted by Lezbert View Post
    * Passhole -- Aggressive driver who stops at nothing just to get in front of you, saving him/herself a whopping 10 seconds.
    -2000 Road King Classic with lots of sentimental value
    -M.I.T.G.C. #72

  10. #10
    Flirting With The Redline 8000 Posts! Trials's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2011
    Location
    Ontario
    Posts
    8,669
    learning on a big bike makes it pretty hard to learn how to wheelie or take big air on speed bumps too

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •