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Thread: Banámichi, Sonora, Mexico

  1. #1
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    Banámichi, Sonora, Mexico

    This past November, a friend on mine wanted to ride down into Mexico. The timing was good, as there was a motorcycle meetup happening at Hotel Los Arcos, in Banámichi, Sonora. Banámichi is on the Ruta Rio Sonora, a real pretty road that runs from Cananea, Sonora down to Ures, Sonora. So we went. My bud, Woody, was on one of the newer Polaris Indians, I on the GS I got from OBX.
    We spent an uneventful night at the Motel 6 in Nogales, AZ, then crossed the border and took Hiway 15 south. First to K21 where we got our mexican paperwork sorted, then down to Imures, where we picked up Hiway 2 east bound to Cananea. Then south onto the Ruta Rio Sonora to Banámichi.


    Cananea is a mining town, and this is one of the smelter buckets.


    Hotel parking.




    Hotel inside dinning room. Used mostly for desyuno, breakfast.

    Our first meal at the hotel was carne asada tacos. These were made with Sonoran beef. If you ever get to Mexico,
    you gotta try sonoran beef. Sooooooooooooo much better than the commercial beef we get here in the US.

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    After supper, was music. Several of the guests played guitar, and the host played mouth harp.
    This became the nightly ritual.


    The next day, part of the meetup was a tour to a local Bacanora still. Bacanora is the local moonshine, made from the hearts of the agave. Sorta the local tequila. Many ranches still produce their own hooch.
    After trimming the hearts, they are buried in these pits that have had fire in them for hours. The pits are sealed, and the hearts cook for a day or so.


    After cooking, they are brought out and allowed to cool. After cooling, they are smashed with splitting mauls into pulp.





    After being beaten to a pulp, they are put in vats with some water and allowed to ferment.



    After fermentation, they juice is cooked in a still, with the bacanora coming out the end pipe.









    You could buy a quart bottle for $200 pesos.
    In addition to the still tour, they also made us lunch.



    There were three kinds of tamales, multiple salads, salsas, beans, and home made sonoran tortillas. Sonoran tortillas are flour, but made really thin. You can almost see thru them. Not thick like tex-mex tortillas. Perfect for rolling anything in.








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    That afternoon, was kick back time. But the evening entertainment was the local high school came and danced for us. Ballet Focklorico! It was really great to
    see high school kids interested in something beside video games, and Facebook. They were incredible.







    After the dancing, was pizza dinner, and more music from the guitars.


  4. #4
    Miles of smiles We've stopped counting... asp125's Avatar
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    Loving this thread when the first post showed food! . so.. how was the Bacanora?
    When life throws you curves, aim for the apex

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    Contributor We've stopped counting... Bugguts's Avatar
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    Another awesome thread. So enjoying this. But gaining weight from all this great food! Totally agree about the dancing high school kids! Noshoes, you know how to live life!
    Quote Originally Posted by bikebitsmall View Post
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    Quote Originally Posted by CaptCrash View Post
    A body not rattling was a body unsure.

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    Quote Originally Posted by asp125 View Post
    Loving this thread when the first post showed food! . so.. how was the Bacanora?
    I'm told it was good. I don't drink adult beverages anymore. Just get in too much trouble. lol.

    The next day we headed south to Ures, Sonora to find a candy factory that somebody told us about.
    We passed thru a bunch of small villages, each having at least one church. So I took some church pix.













    This was my bud Woody getting fuel for the first time in Mexico. He's from Calif where you pump your own gas. In MX, they pump it for you. Sorta.
    They at the least set and turn on the pump, then hand you the nozzle. Woody had a hard time with that. I found it pretty funny. Riding in Mexico, you have to change
    a lot of your thinking, and your expectations. It took Woody a couple days, but by the time we rode north again. He pretty much got it.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Bugguts View Post
    .....Noshoes, you know how to live life!
    No doubt about it, I am blessed.
    Absolutely, no doubt.

    Once we got into Ures, we started looking for somewhere to eat. Figured it's not a good idea to go to a candy factory on an empty stomach.
    We ended up at a street taco stand.







    After dinning, we wandered around looking for the candy factory, after many wrong turns, and asking directions in broken spanish, we finally found it.



    With candy in hand, we headed back north to Banámichi. A nice way to spend the day.

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    Back at the hotel, we had supper, dessert and more music.





    The next day, it was pack up and head back north to the border.













    And lastly, our last meal in Mexico. Pollo asado on the libre road in Nogales, Sonora.



    Thanks for coming along!

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    Contributor We've stopped counting... Bugguts's Avatar
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    Excellent!
    Quote Originally Posted by bikebitsmall View Post
    64 is not old, we have one poster here at 110
    Quote Originally Posted by CaptCrash View Post
    A body not rattling was a body unsure.

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    Moderator/RiderCoach We've stopped counting... Missy B's Avatar
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    Love your reports! Thanks for sharing them.
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