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Thread: Braking to throttle transition, and vice versa

  1. #11
    RiderCoach We've stopped counting... LoDownSinner's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by OBX-RIDER View Post
    I have to add a caveat. I watch a lot of Moto3/Moto2/MotoGP ... free practice/qualifying/race ... so I see a lot of really really good riders ... crash trail braking. Mebbe just a little too much brake ...
    OR, possibly braking just a fraction too late?
    Quote Originally Posted by OBX-RIDER View Post
    put the whiffer in the dilly

  2. #12
    RiderCoach 5000 Posts! NORTY's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by OBX-RIDER View Post
    Good stuff. I was a finish the braking then turn

    Cornerspeed emphasizes that when braking the front fork is compressed ... and the bike turns easier and faster with the fork compressed. Yet the way I was doing it ... the fork is compressed... brakes released ... forks extend ... bike turned ... forks somewhat compressed ... boingo ... boingo ... Trail braking ... braking... compressed ... as you ease off brakes turn ... forks stay compressed ... not as much as braking but some.

    I have to add a caveat. I watch a lot of Moto3/Moto2/MotoGP ... free practice/qualifying/race ... so I see a lot of really really good riders ... crash trail braking. Mebbe just a little too much brake ... like 41% when the cornering is using 60% ... so my brake/corner is more like totaling 90%. Ideally braking goes to zero as cornering comes to 100 or maybe 99%. With me braking is zero when cornering is mebbe 80% then I continue to 90-95%. I'm ok sliding the rear tire ... a little. When I slide the front tire it is either a) a mistake ie. I went off throttle momentarily or b) I am riding over my head ...
    This was my thought also...

    Upsetting the chassis has got to reduce available tire friction. And, as we know, the rider with the most tire friction can change speed and direction quicker than the other riders. (With all else being equal.)
    Last edited by NORTY; 06-05-2016 at 12:47 PM. Reason: added stuff.
    Knowledge speaks, wisdom listens.

  3. #13
    RiderCoach 5000 Posts! NORTY's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by LoDownSinner View Post
    Man, I have a vintage YZ400 that would love to come out there and do some desert racing!
    BRING IT!

    And actually, I'm a firm believer that riding on dirt is one of the greatest preps for roadracing. It allows you to develop the confidence, reflexes and responses to be able to handle those times when the bike gets a little loose.
    This skill definitely makes for a more "well rounded" motorcyclist.
    If you watch the really fast guys, you'll see that nearly every turn is taken in a light two-wheeled drift, kind of like on sand, but MUCH less. Being someone "who races to participate," I have no clue how they do it consistently...
    Some say, they "remove the overheated top layer of rubber" when they slide, exposing cooler rubber that offers more grip. (Hasn't become "greasy" yet.) While being in a 1 wheel drift doesn't bother me, a 2 wheel drift would have me nervous as hell. Scared too.
    Knowledge speaks, wisdom listens.

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