View Poll Results: Tire Pressure Choices

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  • I follow the bike manufacturer's recommendation (in the manual or on the frame)

    12 75.00%
  • I follow the pressure noted on the tires' sidewalls

    0 0%
  • I use custom pressures

    4 25.00%
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Thread: Tire Pressure Survey

  1. #1
    RiderCoach 4000 Posts! AZridered's Avatar
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    Tire Pressure Survey

    Just gathering information. If you choose to use a non-standard pressure, I'd be curious to know how you arrived at your number(s).

    Thanks

  2. #2
    Miles of smiles We've stopped counting... asp125's Avatar
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    I voted. This is for STREET riding, right?
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  3. #3
    Flirting With The Redline 8000 Posts! shonuff's Avatar
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    Need an for "all of the above".
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  4. #4
    RiderCoach 5000 Posts! NORTY's Avatar
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    Just like most moto questions asked by students, sometimes, the best answer is, "it depends on other factors."
    Knowledge speaks, wisdom listens.

  5. #5
    Flirting With The Redline 2000 Posts! Sorg67's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by NORTY View Post
    Just like most moto questions asked by students, sometimes, the best answer is, "it depends on other factors."
    I think that is why AZRidered asked for reasoning for the answers. Lower pressure for off road for example.

    I have wondered here in Florida when I start out in the morning when it is cool if I might want to start a couple psi low to consider the impact of higher temperatures later in the day.

    Or do I bring a temperature gauge with me and let a little air out later. And if i do that, how do I adjust for checking a warm tire rather than a cold tire? And should I carry a pump so that if I let to much pressure out, I can put some back in?

    On longer trips, how closely do you monitor tire pressure? For the average Joe, is starting out with the tire pressure recommended in the owners manual good enough?

  6. #6
    RiderCoach 10,000 Posts! SoCal LabRat's Avatar
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    Hard to believe I'm the only one who voted "custom pressures." It was a difficult choice. I base my pressures on the recommended psi in the manual, but usually add 2 or 3 psi for wiggle room for street riding. When I check my pressures and they are spot on the recommended pressures I don't add any but happily run as is.
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  7. #7
    RiderCoach 5000 Posts! NORTY's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Sorg67 View Post

    I have wondered here in Florida when I start out in the morning when it is cool if I might want to start a couple psi low to consider the impact of higher temperatures later in the day.
    Analytical, aren't you! Starting out with low tire pressure will heat up your tires quicker. In the frozen tundra of "Titletown" in winter, this may be ok, but in Floriduh, you're going to want to pump them up to MOM's specification. 2-up/high speed operation? Again, check MOM. This canned response is due to liability concerns. I most likely will do something different, but it depends on many factors.

    Or do I bring a temperature gauge with me and let a little air out later.
    Having a pressure gauge is always a good idea.
    And if i do that, how do I adjust for checking a warm tire rather than a cold tire?
    The easiest way would be to check your tires in the garage before you roll, then record your #'s. Then measure the pressure change at defined intervals. You'd also have to make notes of outside temperature change/altitude change/humidity/UV energy absorbed by the tire's/how aggressively the moto in ridden, along with lots of other factors. This would become a science experiment.
    For example: How much heat would be absorbed (or retained) by cast wheels vs. laced wheels? Steel vs. aluminum? Or, carbon fibre?Kina fun to over think things, isn't it?
    And should I carry a pump so that if I let to much pressure out, I can put some back in?
    Nah, you only need to carry "air" for emergency uses.
    EDIT~ Sorry, misread this query. Not a bad idea to have a compressed air cart in your tool bag on your bike. Doesn't take up much room, and can get you to a gas station for proper inflation hopefully. For the most part, bleeding off pressure during a street ride isn't advisable. Now, going from street to dirt, back to street? That is a different process. Just like in "rock crawling" the term "air down" means just that. But the reciprocal occurs when you get back "on road."

    On longer trips, how closely do you monitor tire pressure?
    I monitor my tires every time I swing a leg over any motorcycle. Mostly, it's just a visual, but I DO look closely.
    For the average Joe, is starting out with the tire pressure recommended in the owners manual good enough?
    Yes, but ARE we average?
    Last edited by NORTY; 03-06-2016 at 09:16 AM. Reason: because I can! still....
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  8. #8
    Flirting With The Redline 8000 Posts! Trials's Avatar
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    Being a lightweight rider I tend to start with the lowest recommended tire pressure in the manual, example:

    Tire air pressure
    Front 39 – 44 kPa (0.40 – 0.45 kgf/cm2, 5.6 – 6.5 psi)
    Rear 29 – 34 kPa (0.30 – 0.35 kgf/cm2, 4.3 – 5.0 psi)

    Recommended works out pretty good for me.
    If my tires leak down much below those lowest settings I start to feel the rims hitting sharp rocks, if they leak down drastically the tubeless rear can go completely flat and run risk of spinning on the rim or coming off the bead. On the street low pressure can make the bike feel squiggly in the corners, high pressure makes it ride harsh and reduces traction. I can't recall any of my service manuals being too far off from what actually works.

    I always have a tire pressure gauge in my fanny pack if you need to borrow it.
    … and a compact air pump and a first aid kit and a swiss army knife and some zip ties
    Last edited by Trials; 03-06-2016 at 09:04 AM.

  9. #9
    RiderCoach 5000 Posts! NORTY's Avatar
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    Nitrogen vs. regular air? According to Boyle's Law, the difference is neg...

    Or, how about inflation with medical oxygen?


    Would hydrogen make your tires lighter, or heavier, or the same weight? Would H offset the add'l weight of "balloon" tires appreciably? When in a moto showroom, I just like asking leading questions, just to see what they know...Like when talking to a motorcycle salesman, It's fun to asl
    Last edited by NORTY; 03-06-2016 at 09:14 AM. Reason: hmmm, that was odd....
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  10. #10
    Flirting With The Redline 2000 Posts! Sorg67's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by NORTY View Post
    Analytical, aren't you!

    Busted
    Starting out with low tire pressure will heat up your tires quicker. In the frozen tundra of "Titletown" in winter, this may be ok, but in Floriduh, you're going to want to pump them up to MOM's specification. 2-up/high speed operation? Again, check MOM. This canned response is due to liability concerns. I most likely will do something different, but it depends on many factors. Having a pressure gauge is always a good idea. The easiest way would be to check your tires in the garage before you roll, then record your #'s. Then measure the pressure change at defined intervals. You'd also have to make notes of outside temperature change/altitude change/humidity/UV energy absorbed by the tire's/how aggressively the moto in ridden, along with lots of other factors. This would become a science experiment.

    Sounds like something I will have to try
    For example: How much heat would be absorbed (or retained) by cast wheels vs. laced wheels? Steel vs. aluminum? Or, carbon fibre?Kina fun to over think things, isn't it? Nah, you only need to carry "air" for emergency uses.
    EDIT~ Sorry, misread this query. Not a bad idea to have a compressed air cart in your tool bag on your bike. Doesn't take up much room, and can get you to a gas station for proper inflation hopefully. For the most part, bleeding off pressure during a street ride isn't advisable. Now, going from street to dirt, back to street? That is a different process. Just like in "rock crawling" the term "air down" means just that. But the reciprocal occurs when you get back "on road."

    I monitor my tires every time I swing a leg over any motorcycle. Mostly, it's just a visual, but I DO look closely.

    Interesting
    Yes, but ARE we average?
    We are all average in some respects and atypical in others. As a motorcycle newbie, I am trying to work out where average is good enough for me and where different standards may apply.

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