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Thread: Need some help deciding which bike to get

  1. #11
    Quote Originally Posted by NORTY View Post
    Yes, good idea to complete your moto course prior to getting your bike.

    How tall are you? How about an adventure bike, like a Honda 500X?

    Is getting a 600, your preference, or your buddies preference? I know the "feeling of inclusion" can be strong with we humans, but you must ride your own ride.

    Don't ride your buddies ride.

    What models of dirt bikes have you ridden?

    Experience with a Yamaha XT 225 is totally different than a CR500...
    Im 5"10 and its my preference honestly i like the speed capability just there when i need it. Yz250, and a yz125 and my buddies ninja 250. i mean its not like im going to be riding top speed just nice to have it when i need it. i mean i understand and appreciate what everyone in the comments are saying i respect your guys's decision im just asking for oppinions on what would be a good starter 600cc. i mean iv seen people who have never rode before jump on a R1 and a cbr600 and have never wiped out/crashed/ or dropped there bike not saying itl never happen to them. Trial and error, anythings bound to happen ofcourse.

  2. #12
    RiderCoach 5000 Posts!
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    How old are you?

  3. #13
    Flirting With The Redline 6000 Posts! atomicalex's Avatar
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    LOL at you, Helen!! Calling it like it is....

    Anyone who can't have fun hooning a 250 really doesn't know how to ride. I'm very blunt about that. I also think the Honda CBR250R is illegal levels of fun. It is a wonderful street hooning machine.

    You want to fit in, right? That's ok. Really, it's a completely natural feeling. NORTY has the right point though - you need to look at this like a car. You won't grow out of a Civic. You'll dead in a Corvette. Now take a bike, which has two fewer wheels, about 5x the power/weight ratio, and about 1/10th the safety features (ok, more like 1/100th), and you're thinking that you need a Corvette to keep up? At least you've not thought about litre bikes, the air-cooled 911s of the motorcycle world.....

    The secret of 250s is that they are quick instead of fast. Absolutely true that most run out of steam around 85mph. But what are you doing that requires going that fast?
    Katherine goes to Fahrschule - the German rider training thread :: Nine Days in the Alps :: BRC 2014 :: Finding GS Land
    2012 CBR250R (sold), 2001 Super Sherpa, 2004 BMW F650GSa - not a big Ford truck...

  4. #14
    RiderCoach 5000 Posts!
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    I wasn't trying to belittle but aspects of the posts point to Sunday being a young man. He says he's done the research on bikes but the biggest thing that gets a lot of young men is when they go to get insurance. I had a student who said he was dead set on getting an R6, until he found out that full coverage (because there would be a lien on the bike) was going to cost him $8000 a year.

    Btw, the biggest issue I have from all of the posts is the statement "I want the power in case I need it." That's all well and good, but that power is there when you don't need it, too. One stupid ham fisted noobie mistake can be fatal on a super sport.

    And yes, anything is possible. But just because someone managed to survive learning on a big bike doesn't mean it's the safest/best way to start.

  5. #15
    RiderCoach 1000 Posts! lionlady's Avatar
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    Check insurance rates on the bikes you're considering, then come back.



    ...we'll wait.
    If you are always trying to be normal, you'll never know how amazing you can be. -Maya Angelou

  6. #16
    Flirting With The Redline 8000 Posts! Trials's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Sunday View Post
    Very true i see exactly what youre saying. Maybe its my stubornes reflectying not sure. But regardless im going to start off on a 600cc...
    Heck, I figured that out from your first 2 posts .

    Quote Originally Posted by Sunday View Post
    ...never been on a fz6r but was reading on them and from consumer review people said that they were the ideal starter bike for someone who doesnt want lower than a 600cc because of the throttle restrictor.
    I bet these consumer review people are journalists and not motorcycle riders. Throttle restrictors are great for a 6 year old kid riding a mini-bike, because it makes the bike slow enough that you can run along side of them when they are first learning and possibly help them. That is about the extent of a throttle restrictors value, they have no place on a big powerful motorcycle. ANY motorcycle can have its throttle range or performance restricted. Give me any motorcycle for ~1 hour and I could do that for you, but it will NOT shorten your learning curve. Buying a big powerful motorcycle as your first ever motorcycle WILL extend your learning curve.

    Quote Originally Posted by Sunday View Post
    … seen people who have never rode before jump on a R1 and a cbr600 and have never wiped out/crashed/ or dropped there bike ....
    Those riders are called unskilled novices and if you put them on a race track with their R1's and pitted them against a bunch of highly skilled riders riding fast 250cc bikes, you would see R1's either crashing or being lapped. Salt flats racing they might do very well on.

    How fast you are on the street is directly proportional to your willingness to break the law and ability to not die because you were going way too fast, it is in no way limited by displacement of the motorcycle you are riding. Being fast on the street and not losing your license or crashing badly is a function of rider skill and a measure of luck. (unless you are a uniformed police officer riding a fast bike and somehow immune to the local traffic laws)

  7. #17
    Flirting With The Redline 2000 Posts! Sorg67's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Trials View Post
    How fast you are on the street is directly proportional to your willingness to break the law and ability to not die because you were going way too fast, it is in no way limited by displacement of the motorcycle you are riding. Being fast on the street and not losing your license or crashing badly is a function of rider skill and a measure of luck. (unless you are a uniformed police officer riding a fast bike and somehow immune to the local traffic laws)
    I would bet that if Trials went out riding on a Ninja 250 with Sunday's friends on their 600s, Sunday's friends would not be able to keep up with him....... Unless there was no turning involved.

    Says me, a novice riding a 650..... hahaha. And I am 55, I can't even use youth as an excuse...... I guess I am just terminally dumb.....

    I am sure I could not keep up with Trial either.

  8. #18
    Flirting With The Redline 8000 Posts! Trials's Avatar
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    Sxy Rdr is a lightweight female with apparent riding experience, she rides a CBR1000RR (among other motorcycles) and is married to a cop, I'm betting Sunday will never be able to keep up to here in her home town and neither could I

  9. #19
    Flirting With The Redline 6000 Posts! atomicalex's Avatar
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    Sunday - one other thing - as Trials alluded to, there are some documented very fast riders here. Not only skilled and smooth, but also fast. There are also riders who compete in various forms of motorcycling, trials (look it up), racing, and so on. A few of us compete on four wheels, too.

    The process of getting fast starts with getting smooth. It's a ton easier to learn smooth when you're not trying to keep 100hp under control. A 25hp bike is just that much less bandwidth your brain needs to operate while it learns to finesse inputs. That's why we love 250s - we don't even think when we ride them. All we have to do is point and shoot.That is after years of riding and practicing. When we all started, though, 25hp was more than enough to keep us busy. Once you've got the operation of the controls stuck in your autonomic nervous system, then you start moving up and taking on new tasks to learn.

    The fastest and best F1 drivers all started in gokarts. Not cars.

    We want everyone who comes here to have the chance to get smooth enough to be fast. You are buying yourself a better learning curve when you start smaller. And you get to ride more bikes that way, too.
    Katherine goes to Fahrschule - the German rider training thread :: Nine Days in the Alps :: BRC 2014 :: Finding GS Land
    2012 CBR250R (sold), 2001 Super Sherpa, 2004 BMW F650GSa - not a big Ford truck...

  10. #20
    Flirting With The Redline 2000 Posts! AlwaysLearnin's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Trials View Post
    ..... Throttle restrictors are great for a 6 year old kid riding a mini-bike, because it makes the bike slow enough that you can run along side of them when they are first learning and possibly help them. That is about the extent of a throttle restrictors value, they have no place on a big powerful motorcycle. ANY motorcycle can have its throttle range or performance restricted. Give me any motorcycle for ~1 hour and I could do that for you, but it will NOT shorten your learning curve. Buying a big powerful motorcycle as your first ever motorcycle WILL extend your learning curve.
    ....
    Quote Originally Posted by atomicalex View Post
    ...
    The process of getting fast starts with getting smooth. It's a ton easier to learn smooth when you're not trying to keep 100hp under control. A 25hp bike is just that much less bandwidth your brain needs to operate while it learns to finesse inputs. That's why we love 250s - we don't even think when we ride them. All we have to do is point and shoot.That is after years of riding and practicing. When we all started, though, 25hp was more than enough to keep us busy. Once you've got the operation of the controls stuck in your autonomic nervous system, then you start moving up and taking on new tasks to learn. ....
    Theses two passages bring to mind an experience that occurred within the first couple times out on the Road King (MY oversized starter bike). Control is paramount! I had a parking lot practice incident where I accidentally applied too much throttle with too relaxed a grip and thought I was going off the back end of the bike . I lucked out and kept it under control but came away with a new respect for the throttle. I'm sure there are people here who will agree that this bike is not a performer by ANY means, but even it's modest level of performance can get you in trouble fast.

    Too much power in inexperienced hands = Bad stuff!
    Quote Originally Posted by Lezbert View Post
    * Passhole -- Aggressive driver who stops at nothing just to get in front of you, saving him/herself a whopping 10 seconds.
    -2000 Road King Classic with lots of sentimental value
    -M.I.T.G.C. #72

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