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Thread: Complete change, or not ?

  1. #11
    Flirting With The Redline 2000 Posts! Sorg67's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ninja Rebel View Post
    : I can run the hell out of your Versys, you would probably sh*t in your pants dude ! (I've done 'em...the Versys (nice bromer))...
    Yup I believe you. Thinking my next bike will be less sporty.

  2. #12
    Flirting With The Redline 2000 Posts! Ninja Rebel's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Sorg67 View Post
    Yup I believe you. Thinking my next bike will be less sporty.
    I wouldn't.
    The Versys is a very nice compromise bike.
    I liked it alot when I tested it, as a matter of fact, it was on my shortlist.
    All the reviews I read are excellent.
    Don't discourage yourself Sorg, all comes in due time, persevere, that's the fun of it man !
    Renaud - '97 Kawasaki Ninja ZX-9R/B4

    "Good people hire people better than themselves. So A players hire A+ players. But others hire below their skills to make themselves look good. So B players hire C players. C players hire D players, etc."

    "I do have a peripatetic and active intellectual curiosity" - Guy Kawasaki

  3. #13
    Flirting With The Redline 2000 Posts! Sorg67's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Trials View Post
    Tread depth is only half the formulation for motorcycle traction, nothing sticks like fresh rubber.

    Sadly some tire sizes just don't come in decent fresh rubber and radial tire designs, older bikes like the K100RS are left out in the cold. There was a time when you could get good tires from several different manufacturers for bikes like that, now it's take what you can get.
    Usually best to see what the current competition riders are running and go from there.

    I think your DRZ runs Front 80/100-21 & Rear 110/100-18 which equates to 2.75-3.00 21 front & 4.00-4.50 18 rear in inch sizes. These were the mainstream tire sizes back in the day, so I would expect you will still have lots of choices. Tire options will be designed for either long distance and riding on rock, or softer compounds that are suited to sand, mud and loose material. You could even run Trials block 2-ply radials in the 2.75x21 and 4.00x18 sizes. They have their place, it's just not usually on pavement. Used Trials tires should be easy to source cheap if you can locate the local amateur competition Trials riders and want to test them out. Anybody who takes the sport serious, changes their tires out frequently. Michelin even makes a 1-ply radial rear tire in 4.00x18 that weighs a full pound less then the 2-ply equivalent. would transform your bike for riding some terrain such as riding over wet logs and river beds all that fun stuff.
    My DRZ is a pavement princess. Mostly concerned with traction on pavement due to old less grippy rubber. Thinking of getting another set of Bridgestone Trailwing just to have fresh rubber.

  4. #14
    Flirting With The Redline 8000 Posts! Trials's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Sorg67 View Post
    My DRZ is a pavement princess....
    If that is true, you should seriously consider shelving all the original bits and converting it to SM spec. Dual-sport tires and tire sizes are always a tradeoff for strictly pavement use. Keeping all the original parts and eventually fitting them with real dirt rubber will allow you to make the bike convertible in the future.

    Hopefully somebody with a DRZ-SM can chime in and offer some experienced opinions on this.
    I tend to be very Dirt bias because I live on dirt roads

  5. #15
    Flirting With The Redline 2000 Posts! Ninja Rebel's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Sorg67 View Post
    My DRZ is a pavement princess. Mostly concerned with traction on pavement due to old less grippy rubber. Thinking of getting another set of Bridgestone Trailwing just to have fresh rubber.
    I had to Google "DRZ-SM" - a nice bike !
    I would make it a "super-bike" with slicks
    Renaud - '97 Kawasaki Ninja ZX-9R/B4

    "Good people hire people better than themselves. So A players hire A+ players. But others hire below their skills to make themselves look good. So B players hire C players. C players hire D players, etc."

    "I do have a peripatetic and active intellectual curiosity" - Guy Kawasaki

  6. #16
    Flirting With The Redline 2000 Posts! Sorg67's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ninja Rebel View Post
    I wouldn't.
    The Versys is a very nice compromise bike.
    I liked it alot when I tested it, as a matter of fact, it was on my shortlist.
    All the reviews I read are excellent.
    Don't discourage yourself Sorg, all comes in due time, persevere, that's the fun of it man !
    I think the Versys will be an ok choice to get some seat time. Although I wonder if I should have gotten a bike with ABS. I am also thinking I might like a F650GS twin or F700GS better. A little less sporty but plenty nimble enough for me.

    The biggest issue I have with my Versys is that I come into corners very slowly and there is a jolt when I gradually roll on the throttle. It causes me to either launch into corners faster than I want if I begin to roll on as I enter the corner or it gives me a jolt as I am going through the corner which then makes we want to back off the throttle which is not the right thing to do.

    I think the bike can easily handle coming into corners much faster than I do and if I did, then I would not be at the point where the throttle gives me a jolt and it would be fine. The other solution is coming into corners in a lower gear / higher rpms so that I am above the jolt point on the throttle. That may be optimal, but at higher rpms, the throttle is very sensitive to slight movements and makes it difficult to corner smoothly.

    I think a less responsive bike would be more comfortable for me to ride and more enjoyable. The DRZ also has a little jolt when rolling on the throttle, but it is much less and that throttle is much less responsive so I can manage it with much more confidence. At this point, the DRZ is a lot more fun to ride than the Versys for me. Just because I have more confidence on it and I can think about things other than managing the throttle smoothly.

  7. #17
    Flirting With The Redline 2000 Posts! Sorg67's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ninja Rebel View Post
    I had to Google "DRZ-SM" - a nice bike !
    I would make it a "super-bike" with slicks
    Mine is the DRZ400S not the SM. The S is dual sport, the SM is supermoto. I have ridden the SM and it is a very fun bike to ride. Very nimble and sporty, but very manageable too. Just not a bike you what to ride very far. It might be the optimal choice for 90% of my riding.

  8. #18
    Flirting With The Redline 2000 Posts! Ninja Rebel's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Sorg67 View Post
    Mine is the DRZ400S not the SM. The S is dual sport, the SM is supermoto. I have ridden the SM and it is a very fun bike to ride. Very nimble and sporty, but very manageable too. Just not a bike you what to ride very far. It might be the optimal choice for 90% of my riding.
    Googled it too.
    A "Trail" for beginners or mellow riders, like the smaller GS from BMW like the 650, boring...(ha !)
    The Versys (1000) is a Trail for already pretty confirmed riders if you ride it rough, 'cos you can, and it's fun, I know...+ it's a Kwak ! (don't fancy much Suze's, the quality of the "finish" is inferior)
    (you have the 1000 or the 650 ?)
    Renaud - '97 Kawasaki Ninja ZX-9R/B4

    "Good people hire people better than themselves. So A players hire A+ players. But others hire below their skills to make themselves look good. So B players hire C players. C players hire D players, etc."

    "I do have a peripatetic and active intellectual curiosity" - Guy Kawasaki

  9. #19
    Flirting With The Redline alba's Avatar
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    Sorg, fellow Versys rider here. My first bike was a maxi-scoot where I could twist the throttle half an inch and nothing would happen, and not much happened when I whacked it full open! So going from this to the Versys was a shock and a challenge. I don't have a lot of advice to give you other than stick with it, it will get better. The jerky throttle response never goes away but you learn to ride around it. Not sure if this is good technique or not but at slower speeds when I want to close the throttle a tiny bit I close it completely and then open it to where I want it to be. This seems to upset the bike much less than trying to move the throttle just that little bit. It's important to be on the throttle before you start your corner. Once on the throttle and accelerating I don't get the jerky response.

    The Versys is not a sport bike, it is a standard that lives up to its versatile name. I've taken it off road and I've taken it to race tracks and it's been happy in both environments. It's probably not as easy to ride as your DRZ but I would take that as a challenge, and as part of your learning. Or concentrate on the DRZ for now and once you have a lot more miles under your belt go back to the Versys and take on the new challenge. There is no doubt in my mind which is the better road bike so it's worth while sticking with it if you plan on doing just street riding.

    And for Ninja Rebel.....


  10. #20
    Flirting With The Redline 8000 Posts! Trials's Avatar
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    For your shopping pleasure: http://www.motostrano.com/Supermoto-.../kit-bones.htm
    Conversion would allow you to run Pirelli Diablo Rosso II tires, which I can contest to as being a very good street tire for wet or dry pavement conditions.
    they're pretty darn good on gravel roads too.


    Excellent Husqvarna video btw everybody should watch that.
    Notice he wears a back pack and doesn't have the bike all loaded down with bulky saddle bags and a top box

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