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Thread: What Style of Bike for Beginner?

  1. #51
    Flirting With The Redline 10,000 Posts! Shadow Shack's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Trials View Post
    Note that mono-shockers hurt less when they fall on you, fewer bolts and gizmos sticking out, more plastic shielding and bodywork.
    True that.



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  2. #52
    Quote Originally Posted by Trials View Post
    Sounds to me like you have a few more crashes in you before you are ready deal with traffic and that makes you prime Dirt bike candidate material imho
    note: the grassy knoll is much softer to land on then concrete, and there are no cars following you to run you over

    The difference between those 2 bikes was that one has been probably serviced more or trashed less, the second is more bent, used, abused and neglected. A motorcycle that is well cared for and maintained will operate worlds better then one that is ridden hard and put away twisted.
    If you should ever happen to bend your levers or bars for instance. Replace them, don't try to learn with bent controls, they will never feel right.

    You realize; he threw you once, now you gotta get right back on that horse or you will never ride him.
    where did you get the bruises, did the twin shocks get you ?:I
    When bike shopping: Note that mono-shockers hurt less when they fall on you, fewer bolts and gizmos sticking out, more plastic shielding and bodywork.
    Ha! Great points all around. Bike dug into my shins. I was pretty upset about the drop so I can't even tell you how it happened or what caused it. Mostly my ego was bruised. The next day another rider dropped her bike so I was not alone.

    I'm a pretty short guy so the dual sports at the course did not feel comfortable for me. I feel that for me, being able to keep my feet flat on the floor is important, especially at this stage of my learning.

  3. #53
    Flirting With The Redline 8000 Posts! Trials's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by NightEyes77 View Post
    ...can't even tell you how it happened or what caused it....
    They really should film those things, it is best to learn from your crashes, you pay dearly for them.
    plus we want to see them in slo-mo and go ow, ooo, ouch, oof ! that really hurt

  4. #54
    Flirting With The Redline 2000 Posts! Kootenanny's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by NightEyes77 View Post
    I'm a pretty short guy so the dual sports at the course did not feel comfortable for me. I feel that for me, being able to keep my feet flat on the floor is important, especially at this stage of my learning.
    Don't let your height limit you!

    I believe you should learn to "tripod" right away when you're learning to ride. Getting comfortable with only one foot down will add to your confidence, now and as your riding career progresses. I don't know how hard it may be to become comfortable with tripod stops later on, but...well, I've met long-time experienced riders who felt restricted to riding bikes they could flatfoot, due to being dependent on the "crutch" of flatfooting to feel comfortable. After some years, that habit can be hard to overcome.

    On the other hand, I've taught many people to tripod right off the start--both short and tall. It actually provides a more secure stop, as you can keep the rear brake engaged. And it allows you to get at least one foot flat down, on bikes where you'd otherwise be on tiptoes.

  5. #55
    Contributor We've stopped counting... MsPotatoPotatoHead's Avatar
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    Well, you can keep a foot on the rear brake even if you *don't* have to tripod the bike.

    I'm one of those who was never comfortable tripodding a bike. Not at the beginning, not after I got competent, and not at any time since. Tried it - had three different bike along the way that required it, and the only one that I could feel remotely comfortable on was the Super Sherpa. Less than 300 lbs with all fluids. The weight was a huge factor in how comfortable I did or did not feel. But that was not a full-fledged road bike, even though it was adequate for day trips. It was meant for light off-road use, and it's a fabulous urban commando commuter vehicle. Even so, I could still get the balls of both feet solidly down, which when riding on anything but smooth pavement was sometimes necessary (especially when duck-walking the bike backwards).

    Bottom line, get what YOU are comfortable with. Agree it's a good idea to push your comfort zone as a means to becoming a better rider, but you also need to do that in manageable increments, or you will get discouraged and just not ride. BTDT. Seen lots of others do the same.

  6. #56
    Flirting With The Redline 2000 Posts! Kootenanny's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by MsPotatoPotatoHead View Post
    Well, you can keep a foot on the rear brake even if you *don't* have to tripod the bike.
    Exactly. And it makes a lot of sense to do so.

    But for those of us who are short, the tripod stop allows us a lot more versatility in bike choice. And the time to get comfortable with it is, IMO, early in the learning period, when everything about motorcycles is new and somewhat uncomfortable--get all the discomfort over at once.

    You mention weight. I own an XT225, very similar to the Super Sherpa you mention; as it happens, this is the lowest seat bike I can remember owning. I can almost flatfoot it--as you say, balls of my feet firmly on the ground. But the only time I feel that is an advantage is offroad. My street bike--which I prefer to ride on pavement--is tall enough that I have to hang one butt cheek off to get one foot down flat. However, I seldom do that--Ii normally balance with only one toe down (and I live in the land of hills, I'm often stopping on less than level surfaces). The important thing is balance--don't try to hold the bike up, just balance it. And that is what I want people to learn very early on in their riding career.

    As for "duck walking the bike backwards," I just get off the bike and roll it back. There is no rule saying you HAVE to stay astride your bike to back it up.

    Anyway, we've had this conversation before. I agree a rider should get a bike they are comfortable with--but I believe that one should get into the habit of tripodding at stops, preferably very early during the learning period. This not only makes a much wider variety of bikes comfortable for shorter riders, it provides a more secure stopping position for all riders regardless of height.

  7. #57
    Contributor We've stopped counting... MsPotatoPotatoHead's Avatar
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    No argument on the desirability of learning to tripod the bike as a matter of course. I just don't want anyone here to feel like they are somehow *lacking* if they aren't comfortable on a bike they can't flatfoot. Everyone has different comfort zones and risk levels, not to mention different levels of strength and coordination.

    I wouldn't try to discourage anyone who feels capable of it from buying a bike that they couldn't flatfoot. It just makes me twitch a little to see that kind of pressure on new riders to do something they've already said they're not comfortable with. Sometimes that "encouragement" comes across as "aw, geez, man, don't be such a big fat pussy."

  8. #58
    Well I will shortly be the new owner of a suzuki tu250x. It's a 2013 with 690 miles. It looks mint, way different than the ones at the BRC. I rode it at the BRC, I can flat foot it despite my short height, it is light and for my aesthetic tastes, it looks super cool and unfortunately, that came into play.

    Is tripod just putting your left foot down and keeping the right foot up? At the BRC I was doing that instinctually and not putting down both feet at stops. Is it better as a beginner to come to a stop with both feet on the ground?

  9. #59
    Contributor We've stopped counting... MsPotatoPotatoHead's Avatar
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    Some refer to "tripodding" as just putting one foot down, whether or not you have to lean the bike over to do it.

    I consider it "tripodding" only when you *have* to lean the bike over to get a foot down. Stopping while keeping your right foot on the brake is a good habit to develop. Sounds like you are already comfortable with that, so you're ahead of the game. Good on you!

    Also, CONGRATS ON THE NEW BIKE!!!!

    And, remember, it doesn't exist until you post pics!

  10. #60
    Well, still have to work out the final details but should be a couple of days. Woooo hoooo. Guy from the bike shop volunteered to ride it to my house for me and then I can drive him back. I told him otherwise I'd have to pick it up at 5:00 AM when roads are empty. Ha!!! Fun stuff. Gotta start somewhere.

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