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Thread: New "old guy"

  1. #201
    Bugguts...funny how other people in a particular hobby can coin a nickname for ya.

    In another life.....(with first wife) I was very much involved in the classic car hobby. I always had several
    pristine Olds 442's or Hudson Hornets......and while at a cruise or a car show...if a drop of rain happened
    I packed up and was outta there ASAP. One time I was so efficient at it. I left and none the guys I cruised with
    saw me leave. To them, I was there one second and gone the next. The leader of our group started calling me "Drops"
    because he said one rain drop and Bob is long gone....

  2. #202
    Contributor We've stopped counting... Bugguts's Avatar
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    I owned (and loved) many a Cutlass's!
    Quote Originally Posted by bikebitsmall View Post
    64 is not old, we have one poster here at 110
    Quote Originally Posted by CaptCrash View Post
    A body not rattling was a body unsure.

  3. #203
    It's been 4 years plus since I started this thread. So, I thought I would update it.
    I have my license. Ride just about everyday April thru Oct. (Harsh, cold winters here with tons of snow)
    Ride anywhere and everywhere.
    So, it is a success story.
    My wife also got her license, has her own bike and we certainly enjoy riding.
    What got me started on the correct path? Well, a state MFS course did it.
    They were far superior to the Harley riders course I had taken. Tons better.....no comparison.
    Passed that course will flying colors and received my motorcycle endorsement.
    Continued my riding experience slowly progressing to where I am now.
    Now into my 5 season of riding.....on my 4th bike, a 2008 Suzuki Boulevard C50 that picked up end of last season.
    It had 1165 miles when I bought it. Was like a new bike!
    Anyway love riding, love the bike.
    And for anyone whose riding career gets off to a bad start-----Don't give up!
    You CAN do it.

  4. #204
    Good to hear. I have known several would be riders who had one bad experience and hung it up. Bought a couple of almost new motorcycles from that sort. Education and perseverance will take you a long way. I don't get riders who won't avail themselves of motorcycle education. Why not take advantage of another's knowledge and experience to get a solid boost forward with your own ...
    The best thing you can buy for your motorcycle is gas.

  5. #205
    Flirting With The Redline thud300's Avatar
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    Great post.
    Returning neglected Kawasakis to riding glory since 2014
    1991 Voyager XII "Xaviera", 1998 Concours "Connimus Prime", 1989 454 LTD "Merlin"
    COG #12068 Member of American Voyager Association #ATGATT or stay home
    my YouTube channel: ToastRider



  6. #206
    Flirting With The Redline 2000 Posts! Sorg67's Avatar
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    Chromedome - what would you say are the top five things you have learned over the past four years?

  7. #207
    Hello Sorg67. Nice to hear from you again.

    1) If anyone says " you rode as a teenager....all your skills come right back to you".....Not True!
    2) Taking your state MFS course is paramount!
    3) Look where you want the motorcycle to go!
    4) Ride your own ride....don't let anyone force you to ride above your skill level at any point during your development.
    5) Don't get over-confident. Every time you ride you can learn something that will make you a more proficient rider.

    What about you Sorg67, what are the top 5 things have you have learned?

  8. #208
    Flirting With The Redline 2000 Posts! Sorg67's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by chromedome195 View Post
    Hello Sorg67. Nice to hear from you again.
    Thanks, you too

    Quote Originally Posted by chromedome195 View Post
    1) If anyone says " you rode as a teenager....all your skills come right back to you".....Not True!
    I think anything you learn as a kid is easier to re-learn as an adult. But it will be different and you have to take "re-learning" seriously.

    Quote Originally Posted by chromedome195 View Post
    2) Taking your state MFS course is paramount!
    I took BRC 1 twice and BRC 2. I would like to do an advanced rider course.

    Quote Originally Posted by chromedome195 View Post
    3) Look where you want the motorcycle to go!
    Yup, but it takes practice. Easier said than done.

    Quote Originally Posted by chromedome195 View Post
    4) Ride your own ride....don't let anyone force you to ride above your skill level at any point during your development.
    Yes, double that. Not only at your own skill level, but at your own level of care and caution.

    Quote Originally Posted by chromedome195 View Post
    5) Don't get over-confident. Every time you ride you can learn something that will make you a more proficient rider.
    This is where I am now. I am more confident than I should be for my skill level. I am finding myself riding more aggressively than I know I should.

    Quote Originally Posted by chromedome195 View Post
    What about you Sorg67, what are the top 5 things have you have learned?
    Not sure these are my top 5, but these come to mind at the moment.

    1) Motorcycle tires have more grip than you realize ("trust your tires son, they are better than you" - Cop to OBX
    2) The majority of motorcycle crashes are the motorcycle riders fault as much as we would like to blame cars. And the vast majority of crashes are avoidable.
    3) Take a minute to get your game face on before you get on the bike. Make sure you are focused. Remind yourself of your favorite mistakes before you get on the bike.
    4) Never stop learning. Practice your skills every time you get on the bike.
    5) Head on a swivel. Look everywhere. The sooner you see a hazard the longer you have to avoid it.

  9. #209
    Flirting With The Redline 2000 Posts! Sorg67's Avatar
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    I have also become a believer in learning to ride "by the book" first. Perhaps you will decide to deviate later, but learn the by the book technique first.

    I came to this opinion by deciding that I would approach each stop strictly by the book. In the past, I had sometimes put my left foot down, sometimes my right, sometimes down shifting along the way, sometimes coasting with the clutch pulled in, sometimes stop in gear, sometimes stop in neutral. Sometimes both brakes, sometimes front only, sometimes rear only. I did whatever seemed convenient at the time and did not give it much thought.

    A while back I decided to stop strictly by the book every time:

    1) Use both brakes
    2) Downshift along the way
    3) Stay in gear
    4) Left foot down
    5) Right foot on rear brake
    6) Monitor rear view mirror for traffic behind me before during and after stop
    7) Identify my escape

    Smooth stops, always ready to go, brake light always on

    Having done this for a while now, it has become automatic. I follow those steps almost all the time. Not 100% yet, but it is mostly automatic. A benefit of this being almost automatic is that it frees my mind to be aware of hazards.

    As a result of this, I have become a believer in riding by the book.

    AZridered once commented that he likes to challenge himself to ride as precisely as he can. I like this idea. Many of our bikes are capable of being ridden far beyond what is safe on public roads. Pushing limits and challenging yourself to develop skills can be extremely dangerous when other traffic is around and road surfaces are unpredictable.

    But pushing yourself to ride as precisely as possible is a very safe way to challenge yourself and develop better skills.

    Shadow Shack says; "motorcycles are not dangerous, they are just very unforgiving of incompetence and stupidity."

  10. #210
    Sorg67

    I am with you 100%.
    No matter what, we can always improve.
    And I'll add.....just because you are proficient riding your motorcycle, it does not mean you are proficient on every motorcycle.

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