Results 1 to 6 of 6

Thread: Rust on brake disc- what (if anything) to do?

  1. #1
    Flirting With The Redline 2000 Posts! remy_marathe's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2005
    Location
    CA
    Posts
    2,052

    Rust on brake disc- what (if anything) to do?

    It rained here the past two days, a rare event in these parts, and when I peeked at my front disc brake today it was covered in rust.

    So first the warning- a wet cover against the disc made it worse; if you have a breathable cover, make sure it's not laying right against the disc. My rear disc was exposed to the air, but covered by a tarp above and is looking fine. The front had the cover stretched across it and tucked under it, so it held the water there more. With the front wheel turned in the locked position, I may have to put something up there to space the cover out to keep it from touching.

    Now I have this mild corrosion, and I'm wondering if there's anything I can/should do to remove it? Steel wool was my first instinct, but that could be a remarkably bad idea so I'm holding out for actual info here. Given the tiny diameter involved with the disc and the brake calipers, I'm afraid to do anything to mess with its function But one of these days, I may wish to sell the GS and keeping rust off the disc would go a long way for presentation.

    Anything to be done? Suck it up and accept that they rust quickly?
    *squeak* ... *squeak* ... *squeak* ....
    '98 Suzuki GS500E, a.k.a. "Orange Sonya"
    15,000 miles since 2005, not all of them safe or well executed.

  2. #2
    TBeck2000
    Guest
    The brake surface will polish up really quickly when you use the brakes the first couple of times. Most brake discs will coat with rust fairly quickly if exposed to humidity, but this won't impact their integrity. Some rust faster than others, but it's not worth going to the trouble of trying to track down a special disc.

    One thing you could do to reduce rust would be to spray the areas that the pad does not sweep with hi-temp paint. This will dress it up and keep rust from forming in those areas. I'm not sure what color I would use with your orange bike. Maybe silver or black. This won't stop rust from forming on the surface of the disc, though.

  3. #3
    Yeah, I run the place 3000 Posts! Derick's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Location
    Indianapolis, IN
    Posts
    3,408
    Blog Entries
    6
    Yeah just lke tim said...just ride it...easy at first though, and it will come right off. Next time you go look at new cars, look at their discs..they will be rusted. Its just nature.
    Rain Rain Go Away,
    So I can ride another day.
    Remember when sex was safe, and motorcycles were dangerous?


    Current Bikes:
    2006 Kawasaki Concours///COG#:11628

  4. #4
    sanglant
    Guest
    Go for a mile long ride and look at the rotor. Even without applying the brakes, the pads will sweep off the corrosion you're talking about in just that short a time. If you're really worried, take along a can of brake cleaner and spray down the pads and you'll be fine.

  5. #5
    +1
    You can imagine what the brakes on a car look like after sitting for a while. Rust buffs off immediately.
    Once when I was at the drags, a guy was having trouble getting his drag bike stopped in the shut down area. So, the Rocker Scientist sprayed his discs with W-D 40. Maybe he thought it was brake cleaner, I have no idea. The catch fence caught him on the next run which ended his night of racing.
    VF 500 track bike
    ZX-10R street bike
    '99 ZX-11 "Cruiser"
    Ron

  6. #6
    Flirting With The Redline 2000 Posts! remy_marathe's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2005
    Location
    CA
    Posts
    2,052
    Thanks all- I ran it around like you guys said, and the rust mostly scrubbed off (except for the places where the pads don't contact). I've seen so many hellaciously rusted discs on bikes down by the waterfront, I was worried mine had just joined their ranks overnight, but now it looks almost as good as new. I may look into painting the non-contact parts like TBeck mentioned, but not until I have another reason to disassemble the front wheel.
    *squeak* ... *squeak* ... *squeak* ....
    '98 Suzuki GS500E, a.k.a. "Orange Sonya"
    15,000 miles since 2005, not all of them safe or well executed.

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  

Donate towards our hosting bill!