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Thread: How do I convince my parents I can handle a sportbike?

  1. #31
    Flirting With The Redline 6000 Posts! ds5160's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by do_not_spindl View Post
    So we won't discuss the 3,000-4,000 miles I put on my bicycle each year.
    I put on a similar number of miles on my bicycle every year. Nobody said a word about that number of miles on roads where I've had things thrown at me, trucks intentionally swerve at me to try and run me off the road, not see me and pull out in front of me. Many of the same things we experience as motorcycle riders.

    I mentioned taking the MSF, and other than my girlfriend who encouraged me, and my mom, others were concerned that I am going to kill myself on a motorcycle.

    I believe that my experience on a bicycle helped my experience with traffic that has paid off on the motorcycle.

  2. #32
    Moderator/RiderCoach We've stopped counting... Missy B's Avatar
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    I know that some of the best students I've had have been the teens that come through the class, with Mom or Dad's permission. Sometimes the Dad or Mom attends the class with them. I love to see it, honestly.

    We give them exposure to Street Strategies. We give them a chance to ride a motorcycle in a safe environment.

    There are no bad habits developed with the exception of the dirt riders that we have to remind to use all 4 fingers when using the controls while in class. LOL

    And they are so eager to please, it's very interesting. I haven't had one disrespectful teenager in class yet and I'm in my 4th year of Coaching. It's refreshing, honestly.

    The fact that they are taking a class lets me know that they have a head on their shoulders and I respect them for being smart enough to make that choice AND follow through with it. Even if Mom and Dad say take the class. LOL

    My son told me tonight he wants to be a motor officer or Border Patrol agent. I say, "Go for it!"

    In my case, it's a little hypocritical for me to say he can't ride, but as any mom, I would hope that I would be open to the discussion and not shut it down right away. Then work with him on giving him the tools to find out if this is something he should do or not.

    Maybe you can approach the subject of taking a class again, mebbe with your Dad.
    As a RiderCoach, I know I'd be happy to then discuss with your Mom how you did in class.

    From there, it's up to you to prove how responsible you are and if you have the skills needed to do this at your young age.

    Don't get me wrong, I completely understand where your Mom is coming from. It's scary to let our kids try something dangerous. Some will argue with me that's it's irresponsible and I'm sure I'll take heat for my response here.

    But I can't see denying you or any teenager the opportunity to try it in a safe environment (MSF class) if it's something you can succeed at, do well, and have fun.



    Do you think you could get a dirt bike and run around with that with your Dad? That will help your skills tremendously and once your Mom sees that you aren't crashing your dirt bike into trees, etc, she might be more apt to consider this crazy idea of yours. (I still recommend MSF class first, though, to learn how to operate said dirt bike. Don't learn from your Dad. I'm sure he's a nice guy and all, but leave it to a professional to coach you through the process.)

    Just some late night thoughts.
    CURRENT BIKES: 2014 Suzuki Wee Strom, 2016 Honda CBR500R
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  3. #33
    Moderator/RiderCoach We've stopped counting... Missy B's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by OBX-RIDER View Post
    My son got his pilots license to demonstrate maturity of judgment and the ability to handle hand-eye coordination tasks in a stressful environment. After he passed his Private Pilots written and practical, I let him get his motorcycle endorsement.
    Wouldn't a Wii do the same thing?
    It's a lot cheaper.



    (I kid, I kid, before y'all flame me!)
    CURRENT BIKES: 2014 Suzuki Wee Strom, 2016 Honda CBR500R
    PREVIOUS BIKES: 2002 Ninja 500, 2002 Kawi ZR-7S, 2002 Kawi Concours, 2003 Yamaha XT225, 2006 Yamaha FZ6, 2005 Suzuki Wee Strom, 2004 Honda CRF250R, Yamaha TTR250
    Test riding bikes since 2004.
    If loud pipes save lives, imagine what learning to RIDE that thing will do!

  4. #34
    Flirting With The Redline 6000 Posts! Afflo's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Missy B View Post
    Wouldn't a Wii do the same thing?
    It's a lot cheaper.



    (I kid, I kid, before y'all flame me!)
    Guitar Hero

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  5. #35
    Flirting With The Redline 6000 Posts! TJinPgh's Avatar
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    My suggestion would be to try and convince them to let you get a dirt bike. Ride that for a year. If you don't kill yourself they'll be more apt to consider a street bike.

    Keep in mind that dirt and trail skills doe NOT necessarily translate to street skills, but people tend to think they do so you'll at least have that much to fall back on.

    Beyond that, here's a thought. Go find a small 70s Honda (a twin 200, for example) that you and your dad can work on together. Fix it up, get it inspected and chances are he'll be your ally when it comes to letting you ride it.

    Learn to ride on that. By the time you do that, you'll be old enough to buy your own bike.

  6. #36
    Flirting With The Redline 10,000 Posts! Shadow Shack's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by usafa2015 View Post
    I'm 16 and I recently became aware of the advantages of owning a motorcycle, mainly a sportbike (cheap to buy, cheap to maitain, cheap to insure, cheap on gas).
    You must give me the name of this company that insures 16 year olds on sportbikes cheaply...
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  7. #37
    Contributor 1000 Posts! HappyPuppy's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Shadow Shack View Post
    You must give me the name of this company that insures 16 year olds on sportbikes cheaply...
    In some states WA being one, it is not required so we see a lot of kids and way too big of a bike and have trouble controlling them. I had a 17 yr old backed in a parking spot pull into traffic ahead of me yesterday. He popped the clutch, and lost control and fell over. I got off helped him and the bike up ( it was very low speed) and he and the bike had minimal damage. One thing that would help is if with a learner permit ( as he had) they limited to the bike size. He had no business on a CBR. I suggested he take MSF and get some gear, I hope he does.

  8. #38
    Flirting With The Redline 1000 Posts! Tyee's Avatar
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    usafa, if you were my son, I would want you to show me these things first before I would gladly help you get a motorcycle.

    1. Show me Hough's book, Proficient Motorcycling and be able to have a conversation about any and all parts of the book.

    2. Show me your state's motorcycle driver's book that you must study in order to pass the written test. Be able to have a conversation about different parts of that little book.
    I might then ask for conversations about the driver's car study book too.

    3. Tell me you want to start riding on a Ninja 250R

    4. Show me the money you will pay for full coverage insurance for a year on the Ninja 250R

    5. Show me the Basic Riders Class (BRC) schedule of the Motorcycle Safety Foundation (MSF)

    6. Show me the money you will pay to take the class.

    7. Show me the completed registration form.

    After completing and passing the BRC,

    8. Show me a 3.2 GPA or better. This helps you get a good discount on the insurance coverage.

    9. After all of the above, we go to the bike dealership.

    Finally,

    10. "You" do all the talking with the sales people to buy either a used Ninja 250 or a new one, with your money and "you" ride the bike home.

    Hotcha Kabotcha!

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