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Thread: How do I convince my parents I can handle a sportbike?

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    How do I convince my parents I can handle a sportbike?

    I'm 16 and I recently became aware of the advantages of owning a motorcycle, mainly a sportbike (cheap to buy, cheap to maitain, cheap to insure, cheap on gas). My dad had an old '71 Honda 175 when he was my age and I thought it would be great if I could have my own bike as well. He's pretty much okay with me getting one but my mom insists it is too dangerous, neglecting all the safety gear I'd wear. I heard that a Ninja 250R was a great starter bike and I became hooked. So, how can I coonvince my mom that getting a bike is right for me?

  2. #2
    Flirting With The Redline 1000 Posts! jay956's Avatar
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    shes a mother, its her job to think you will dies as soon as you throw a leg over a motorcycle.

    i would start by telling her about the MSF course.
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  3. #3
    I tried to, but I'll try again I suppose and make sure she's actually paying attention.

  4. #4
    My son got his pilots license to demonstrate maturity of judgment and the ability to handle hand-eye coordination tasks in a stressful environment. After he passed his Private Pilots written and practical, I let him get his motorcycle endorsement.
    The best thing you can buy for your motorcycle is gas.

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    Moderator/RiderCoach We've stopped counting... Missy B's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by OBX-RIDER View Post
    My son got his pilots license to demonstrate maturity of judgment and the ability to handle hand-eye coordination tasks in a stressful environment. After he passed his Private Pilots written and practical, I let him get his motorcycle endorsement.
    Wouldn't a Wii do the same thing?
    It's a lot cheaper.



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    Flirting With The Redline 6000 Posts! Afflo's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Missy B View Post
    Wouldn't a Wii do the same thing?
    It's a lot cheaper.



    (I kid, I kid, before y'all flame me!)
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    RiderCoach 8000 Posts! WoodstockJeff's Avatar
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    Some things to consider... That whole "you are a minor" part is a big factor, and you're going to have to live with what your parents decide... and, even if your dad signs off on getting you into a training class as your first step, to show responsibility and all that other stuff mothers insist upon (primarily as a means of slowing your departure from the nest), you and dad defying her is probably not your best move. You're in the bargaining phase right now. And talk of "sport bikes" doesn't help.

    There's a reason your dad had a bike back then, and doesn't now... and it's probably your mother.

    As for "sport bikes", the Honda 175 your dad had is nothing compared to even the littlest Ninja in the U.S., the EX-250. Many, many people are killed on "sport bikes" each year, because they don't respect what they can do... and they think they're good enough to handle a "little sport bike". Before you can convince Mom that you're can handle one, analyze what makes YOU think you can.

    What is your previous history as a driver? Oops, there's that little problem of no history of your own, just that of every other 16-year-old driver, and it isn't good. Motorcycling is a head game - you have to use your brain to stay ahead of even the smallest motor vehicle, if you want to be safe. You might want to prove yourself in other ways, first.
    Last edited by WoodstockJeff; 07-02-2009 at 01:50 AM. Reason: Spell check is no substitute for putting the right word in...
    Jeff

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  8. #8
    Quote Originally Posted by WoodstockJeff View Post
    What is your previous history as a driver? Oops, there's that little problem of no history of your own, just that of every other 16-year-old driver, and it isn't good. Motorcycling is a head game - you have to use your brain to stay ahead of even the smallest motor vehicle, if you want to be safe. You might want to prove yourself in other ways, first.
    There is a flip side to all this. In two years this young man will be able to join the Army and if he qualifies for Flight School, a year later he could be a Pilot in Command of a UH-60 or AH-64 helicopter flying the same into battle...with little or no "history". We had guys who before their 20th birthday were Flight Leaders with over 1,000 combat flying hours responsible for leading 10 helicopters and over 100 men on air assaults. That's 3 years older than this young man...and a position of responsibility greater than most folks achieve in their lifetime.

    I was one of the 'older' pilots at 20... I also remember being treated like I was 'just a kid' because of my age in the civilian world after those experiences...

    In my grandfather's time a 16 year old was expected to shoulder a man's job. My dad with the help of 'Fearless' Fain (future Chief Pilot of Braniff and a Concorde Captain) rebuilt a Curtiss Robin at 15 and was flying it by 16.

    Some 16 yr olds deserve to be treated like kids...some 16 yr olds deserve to be treated like responsible young men and women.
    The best thing you can buy for your motorcycle is gas.

  9. #9
    Contributor 1000 Posts! HappyPuppy's Avatar
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    Having 2 boys 19 and 23 I went through a similar issue. I rode and they wanted to also at 16. However, MSF gives you parking lot speed skills , not at traffic speeds or conditions. My concern was the lack of driving a car or truck for several years and then going to a bike. We settled on a small dirt bike until at least 18 as it is fun and you can still practice your MSF skills ( they have a course for that too) and get some real seat time in a safer car. BTW way bikes are cheaper to buy and for gas , but I get 6k max on tires and maintenance costs are higher as well as insurance too.

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    Flirting With The Redline 6000 Posts! ds5160's Avatar
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    A friend asked me about learning to ride a motorcycle. She hasn't ridden a bicycle in years. I recommended spending the summer using her bicycle, when reasonable. (Plus, she's always saying she needs to ride more for exercise.) It would give her a sense of what it is like to be amongst the most vulnerable modes road users out there, while allowing her to focus on learning to deal with traffic on something that she already knows how to ride. Then next year take the MSF course and look into a scooter or a motorcycle.

    If you really want to save money, ride a bicycle as much as possible, on the roads and following the road rules, and get a cheapo first car, or borrow your parents' car(s), and pay your insurance. Get the road experience and then learn to ride a motorcycle.

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