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Thread: Video: Beginner Bikes and You.

  1. #1
    Flirting With The Redline MikeZee1's Avatar
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    Video: Beginner Bikes and You.

    Couple of good video's concerning starter bikes from Popular Mechanics.

    Choosing the right bike for you.
    http://www.popularmechanics.com/auto...o/4237046.html


    5 Middleweight Cruisers
    http://www.popularmechanics.com/auto...s/4268696.html
    Got Beer?

    2006 Vulcan 900 LT

  2. #2
    Senior Moderator We've stopped counting... subvetSSN606's Avatar
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    Nice find Mike!

    Tom
    In the end, regrets rarely come from things done, but from things not even tried.


  3. #3
    Flirting With The Redline Fatcat's Avatar
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    Good videos.

    How much did he get paid to advertise the helmet?

    Fatcat

  4. #4
    I've been sitting here for several days feeling very guilty.
    I used to ride a lot when I was younger. It's no joke. I appear and can work out like a 39 -- 40-year-old. Even though I'm 15 years older. The problem is I have not been around motorcycles for about 20 years.
    So before I started reading all of these websites. I just dropped in to a motorcycle shop, and since I had that means. I bought what I thought was a pretty good motorcycle (Ducati 1100) wait! Wait! It fits like a dream I can sit upright. My preferred riding position, and since I'm 6 foot 4' and strong as an ox. It feels like a 250 to me, the 370 pound dry weight is no problem for me. Both of my feet reach the ground while I'm sitting on the seat, flat-footed with my knees bent a little.when I sat on a tiny 250 CC cruiser , one of the staff came by and yelled. You are waaay too big for that bike! I
    It was the most comfortable of all the bikes so I bought it. Now, I find out. It's highly overpowered for a beginner,. I'm not truly a beginner,I used to have a license, I have my permit and have been riding it around deserted neighborhoods and one very large stadium parking lot . That is almost empty all the time. I even chalked out a diagram of what I was told is the California motorcycle riding test. And I can almost do it.
    Yes, the power is a little bit too much to keep going in at 9 Foot Circle . I have been able to circle it twicebut not consistently. I plan to change to a smaller bike for training and testing keeping my Ducati put away for when I'm ready. I've heard of the many disasters with old guys getting back on the bike.
    with way too much power. But honestly, since I am one of the most careful people on the planet. I haven't seen a problem. My dilemma is how long should I wait before switching back up to my nice motorcycle? I don't think I'll ever ride it on the freeway. That seems too risky no matter what bike I have. And since I can ride this big bike like like it was a Vespa,
    how long should I wait?in all my readings. I've not had anyone address, if the bike this size
    is okay for an intermediate rider ,one very big dude, i.e. Samoans,giants, Neanderthals etc. my honest self appraisal is if I had seen a bike with exactly that size configuration with a 650 CC engine I would've bought it. I now feel guilty for buying this fine machine, even though I know I can handle it
    but I won't tell the instructors at the motorcycle safety course that I bought it.


    so here it is ! What is your verdict ?guilty or not !

  5. #5
    Good info on the videos. I was thinking abt a Vstar Custom for my 2nd bike in a few months time and after seeing the video, THAT IS IT!
    Thanks for the links, MikeZee1
    "Adversity causes some men to break; others to break records." - William A. Ward

    2003 Yamaha V star 650 Classic (V2)

    Sold - 2006 250 Virago

  6. #6
    Got some answers
    don't feel guilty anymore.
    As an intermediate with a previous licence
    I have to cool it for a while ,,6mos to a year,,get my "bike legs" back
    store the new bike ....work up Again to the big bike ....because times have changed

    No need to reply to my previous post,,,some nice experts helped me out. I also read some of the threads
    relating to The size and experience problemmmm HMMMM interesting stuff.



    WHO was it that said the only Stupid question is the one not asked?

  7. #7
    Senior Moderator We've stopped counting... subvetSSN606's Avatar
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    I'll answer anyway...

    Get comfortable and feeling good on the smaller bike. However long that takes... it's hard to put a number on it. Time doesn't necessarily equate to miles. And miles don't necessarily equate to experience if you're just doing the same easy stuff all the time.

    Then try the bigger bike again. If you feel at that point like OK, this is more challenging and will take some work but I think I can handle it... go for it. If you feel like "Whoa! I think I could use some more work with the smaller bike, then back up and take another run at it.


    It's fairly easy for us to give advice to someone who has no riding experience. It's not as easy to give advice to someone who has had riding experience and/or is thinking about moving up. In that case I think we have to rely more on you honestly assessing yourself. Really honestly!

    Tom
    In the end, regrets rarely come from things done, but from things not even tried.


  8. #8
    Senior Moderator We've stopped counting... subvetSSN606's Avatar
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    PS

    And again as I've said before... when you move up, treat it like starting over. You've got to get the feel for the nuances of differences from what you were used to. That process will go quicker with more experience, but you still have to learn those difference in handling, braking, weight, and throtttle response.

    Every time I get on a new bike, whether it's bigger or smaller, I take a few minutes just around the parking lot to get a feel for how it behaves, and what language it is going to speak to me and wants me to speak to it. And then I take the time to take it easy at first as I venture further afield and learn more of the bike's vocabulary.

    I hope that makes sense.


    Tom
    In the end, regrets rarely come from things done, but from things not even tried.


  9. #9
    Flirting With The Redline
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    Quote Originally Posted by MikeZee1 View Post
    Couple of good video's concerning starter bikes from Popular Mechanics.
    Choosing the right bike for you.
    http://www.popularmechanics.com/auto...o/4237046.html
    5 Middleweight Cruisers
    http://www.popularmechanics.com/auto...s/4268696.html
    I watched both videos and like them. They both where informative.
    They both have helped me in my decision between:
    Vulcan 500, S40, 883 HD, v star custom, as my first bike.
    You Got anymore videos up your sleeves on these 4-bikes??
    ~Blade Trinity Rocks~
    Kill one man and you're a murder,
    kill a million a King,
    kill em' all a god.

  10. #10
    Flirting With The Redline 6000 Posts! Afflo's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by RangerMatt View Post
    I watched both videos and like them. They both where informative.
    They both have helped me in my decision between:
    Vulcan 500, S40, 883 HD, v star custom, as my first bike.
    You Got anymore videos up your sleeves on these 4-bikes??
    Wow! Watching that guy sit on the Ninja 250 made me feel like a giant. My knee is right around the second "K" in Kawasaki on the right side!
    2011 Triumph America, made perfect with another Corbin Seat.
    (sold) '08 Ninja 650R with super-comfy Corbin seat
    (sold) '06 Ninja 250R, possibly best learning-bike ever.

    "For me it is far better to grasp the universe as it really is than to persist in delusion, however satisfying and reassuring."
    - Carl Sagan - "The Demon-Haunted World" - fantastic read!

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