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Thread: Johnny Pag Spyder 300? Good, ok, or avoid?

  1. #1
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    Question Johnny Pag Spyder 300? Good, ok, or avoid?

    First time poster and owner (coming soon).

    I have been hovering in these boards just reading and Iím close to my training course dates and getting ready for my first bike. This site has already given me great advice but Iím having a problem zeroing in on a bike.

    Iím 31, 5í10 roughly 198-202 lbs. I know better then to go large but really want something to cruise with solo (why would I want her with me!), have fun and just enjoy riding while learning without having to deal with a 900 lbs bike. Iím just not a sport bike guy either. Done the fast cars thing and past that but I also do not want a bike that will take 12 seconds to do 60mph. As for bike experience, notta. Raced/and rode four wheelers like 14 years ago... "Man I'm getting old"

    Also unfortunately due to my area and where I live it does need to safely be able to travel at min 70 mph which concerns me with the smaller cc engines in which I would like to learn with. Avg. speed in my area is around 45-50.

    A bike which has had my attention for a long time for a trainer is the Johnny Pag Spyder 300. Always been more interested in the chopper style so figured that might be a great bike to learn with and upgrade in the future? Only problem I never hear anyone talk about them? (other then alternativecruisers.com) A local custom shop, Chopper City in Orange Park, Fl. sells them and I know that shop is highly recommended and I would find it odd for them to sell flat out junk.

    Of course they say itís a perfect trainer bike but I really hope to find some other owners past or present?
    Thoughts and opinions good or bad are all appreciated

    Thanks!

    Matt.


    http://www.johnnypag.com/motorcycles/spyder300/index.php

  2. #2
    Since I don't have a bike of my own yet, I have been doing a lot of browsing motorcycle on the interwebs. I can't tell you first hand about the quality of these bikes, but judging from the few reviews I've seen online, people are more or less pleased with it.

    However, it seems to be a chinese import bike from a company called Global Strong. Here is a link for comparison:

    http://www.globalstrong.cn/page-cho/cho-7.htm

    Still that doesn't make it a bad bike. I'll leave the reviews up to the people who have experienced the bike.

  3. #3
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    ^ Thanks for the reply.

    Actually that is a different bike.
    I had found that one a while back and broke down the specs.

    Pag version specs are actually very different.
    The one on Global Strong has drum rear brakes, smaller front/rear tires and rim, different speed gauge, bore and stroke are smaller, etc.

    Some specs match but most are different.

    Probably using the same frame, tanks, etc.
    Or a complete knock off.

    Never know with the Chinese imports and all the generic copies of things (Cough, ebay), if it wasnít for the Pag relationship/support (which I have seen as very strong from peoples posts) I wouldnít even consider this bike.

  4. #4
    Yeah, I wasn't sure if it was a knockoff or if Johnny just reworks them. ::shrug::


    Does the rake on chopper style bikes, like the spyder, affect handling?

  5. #5
    Flirting With The Redline We've stopped counting... weaver's Avatar
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    Best explaination I've seen of the physics of motorcycle handling is in Proficient Motorcycling by David Hough. Not saying there aren't other good descriptions, but that's the book I have.

    Basically the steeper the head the more easily the bike turns in.

    Back to the OP. I know this is on the heavier side ~500 lbs but take a look at Kawasaki's Vulcan 500. It has a small sport bike engine in a cruiser frame and a lot of the people around here love them. I have its little brother engine wise and the Ninja 250 can easily hang with highway traffic, with room to spare.

    Edit: As far as average speed being 55 mph, any of the 250 cruisers can handle that and most can take you up to 65-70.
    '05 Blue Kawi EX250 - RIP 6/17/10
    Still in the market. Free is good.
    motorcycle4amonth.blogspot.com

  6. #6
    Geez, you're not talking 95 through Jax, are you?
    That's an insane road (and I live in South Florida!).
    Old highway road, ongoing construction, lane changes, heavy traffic...
    I'd at least plan on working up to that with a few months of riding first.

    On your bike choice, I agree with something like the Vulcan 500. Easy to get it worked on, and we know it can handle highway speed. While you're riding that, you can keep an eye out for a classy looking second ride (not that the Vulcan isn't classy looking!).
    ďBefore you diagnose yourself with depression or low self-esteem, first make sure that you are not, in fact, just surrounded by assholes.Ē
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  7. #7
    Flirting With The Redline 1000 Posts! Tyee's Avatar
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    raptor2002, if you live near that motorcycle shop, get the bike. The steering with the front wheel way out front will not be very good. I wouldn't pay that much for a beginner bike. You most likely will have some slow speed, or putting the bike away accident that's gonna scratch up your new bike. Get a used rebel 250! Then, get a bike of your dreams.

    Hotcha Kabotcha!

  8. #8
    Flirting With The Redline 10,000 Posts! Shadow Shack's Avatar
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    A chopper is to cruisers as a supersport is to sportbikes: not an ideal place to begin riding. Simply put, like a supersport a chopper is better suited for someone that already knows how to ride, as it will offer distractingly funky handling traits that a better suited beginner bike doesn't.

    Check out my Frame Geometry 101 editorial here: http://www.beginnerbikers.org/forum/...ead.php?t=4687

    The added rake and quirky feel of raked trees (the wheel rotates on a different axis than the steering stem) will be very awkward to a new rider, and the additional wheelbase will prevent you from passing the cone weaves at the DMV test among other things. The longer wheelbase mandates a steeper lean in curves at a given speed compared to a stock bike wheelbase (the Spyder is actually a 250 Rebel clone by design), so that will impede a new rider too.

    As far as the Pag bikes go, JP is a former custom bike builder that dabbled heavily in the aftermarket HD scene (think OCC and such). I wouldn't question the design so much as the actual motors used. We have a local bike repair shop here that sells the Pag bikes and they report using actual Honda Rebel parts to replace many of the chinese motor warranty issues. In the end, I would have to recommend one of the more normal wheelbase bikes over the Spyder.

    Best bet is get a Rebel, learn to ride it, and chop it later on. Here's mine, $1000 spent to date including the initial bike purchase, sadly in a back burner state of build but 80% complete nonetheless:



    And next to its sibling, a VT600 Shadow VLX:

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    Ride Safe, Chop Safer "Unofficial Beginner Bike Chop Shop"
    Motorcycles are not unsafe. However, they are extremely unforgiving of inattention, incompetence, ignorance, and stupidity.

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  9. #9

    Johnny pag spyder 300

    I just bought a 300cc spyder and I love the bike. It's has plenty of power and gets tonnes of looks. For the price what are your other choices? A honda 250? Please, that cant even compare. The spyder is awesome

  10. #10
    Flirting With The Redline 10,000 Posts! Shadow Shack's Avatar
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    For the price what are your other choices? A honda 250? Please, that cant even compare.
    See the post directly before yours, that's a Honda 250 that I have just over 1K invested in so far (including initial bike purchase)...

    How is that 300? I've yet to see the revamped water cooled 300, last time I gawked at a Spyder they were still using the 250 Rebel clone motor. Even that was rather impressive, possibly moreso had I not already been involved with my own 250 chopper. It is still a good bargain, all things considered.

    P.S. check out www.outcastcycles.com if you haven't yet, they feature the Pag bikes frequently in their CD-mag. Issue #3 (just released) has an article on them.
    Sent from your mom's phone
    Ride Safe, Chop Safer "Unofficial Beginner Bike Chop Shop"
    Motorcycles are not unsafe. However, they are extremely unforgiving of inattention, incompetence, ignorance, and stupidity.

    http://www.beginnerbikers.org/forum/image.php?type=sigpic&userid=11&dateline=117347893  4
    3500cc worth of Honda: http://shadow-shack.20m.com

    Support your FLIBS (Friendly Local Independent Bike Shop)
    They're far more valuable than you realize...

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