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Thread: Informative videos

  1. #21
    Flirting With The Redline 2000 Posts! blueglassman's Avatar
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    Crash's Videos

    A nice summary of the offset weave portion of the rider's test, U turns, and low speed maneuvering. Thanks Cap'n!

    weave

    Low speed

    U Turns
    Triumph!!!!!

  2. #22
    Quote Originally Posted by Lee510 View Post
    This is a thread with lots of great info. I think I can add to it.

    The above video is good for lighter weight bikes, but isn't the best for larger, heavier touring bikes like the GoldWing or K1200LT. A member of another forum I frequent wrenched his back attempting to get his LT on the stand pressing with his right foot. An ergononimcs engineer(I think) at the seating manufacturer he works for told him the twisting motion he had to use to move the beast was too much for his back. She told him to stand facing the rear of the bike and step on the lever with his left foot. Put all of his weight on that foot. Steady the bike with the left hand and lift (some) with the right.

    I had all but given up on putting my LT on the centerstand except for maintenance. Set it over on the tipover wings once and had to pick it up. It ain't light. Using the precedure outlined above, it goes up on the centerstand everytime. Much less stressful on my nerves, back, and muscles.

    One way to have an easier time with the centerstand would have been to have bought a 2005 or newer model LT. They have a hydro-electric centerstand. One push of a button and it's on the stand.

    Here ya' go:

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Y-8LM2Z_XIg

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=sKaVxTyopu8

    The key is to be SURE that both centerstand feet are on the ground and the bike is balanced on them and to squeeze the clutch (I keep mine in gear because it's easier for me to control getting it OFF the centerstand that way). No heavy lifting involved!

    corvus corax
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    MSF RiderCoach
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  3. #23
    RiderCoach 10,000 Posts! SoCal LabRat's Avatar
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    Ok Raven, so, you inspired me. I backed the Bandit out of the garage, kept the side stand down just in case I would lose it on this side, and had my H stand on the other side. It was almost comical to see me with all my weight on the centerstand on my right foot, and my left foot next to it about 6 inches off the ground. The Bandit raised up about 1/8" and stayed there. Despite numerous attempts, I don't have the leverage (height or weight or whatever the dynamic is) to get it to come back easily like you show.

    I can do it with some help from someone on the other side getting it to the apex (helping to pull back). But by myself, not so much.
    ~Teri
    Quote Originally Posted by Bugguts View Post
    Hey, at my age running hot and loss of spark is a common problem.
    2013 Triumph Tiger 800
    2018 Triumph Street Triple R - Low
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  4. #24
    Don't give up.

    You'll need to practice a little bit to find the balance point but once you do, you'll never have a problem getting a bike on the centerstand again. Trust me on this one, I had a CL360 and a Virago 700 and couldn't get them on the centerstand to save my life (and they're much lighter than the ST) because I didn't know the technique.

    Make sure both centerstand feet are square on the ground and the bike is settled on them. You'll notice in the video that I get it set upright and resting on the centerstand feet and then pause before I do anything else. That little pause is actually the big key to getting it on the centerstand. Step down on the centerstand lever while guiding the bike back (be sure to squeeze the clutch). Whatever you do, don't lift up but go back. Something that may help you get the feel for the balance point is to park on a very slight incline with the front going uphill and the back going downhill. Be sure the incline is very slight. This will help you with the momentum issue and give you the opportunity to get the feel for it. Once you know how the balance point feels, you'll be able to do it anywhere.

    corvus corax
    IBA#22798
    AMA#681202
    MSF RiderCoach
    Lee Parks' Total Control Instructor

  5. #25
    Flirting With The Redline Newrider's Avatar
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    Wow, great videos hqp...I am taking that MSF course in June, helped to see some of what might go on. Picking up the bike video was good as well

  6. #26
    Lurking For The Next Bike 10,000 Posts! hqp921's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Newrider View Post
    Wow, great videos hqp...I am taking that MSF course in June, helped to see some of what might go on. Picking up the bike video was good as well
    Glad to help - and good luck with your course!

    HP

  7. #27
    Flirting With The Redline Newrider's Avatar
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    Thanks, I' m looking forward to it

  8. #28
    Flirting With The Redline 1000 Posts! lledier's Avatar
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    Awesome, I'd been trying to find some of this info.

  9. #29
    Lurking For The Next Bike 10,000 Posts! hqp921's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by lledier View Post
    Awesome, I'd been trying to find some of this info.
    Glad to have helped! There are plenty of useful 'stickies' (Threads that are permanently on the front page of their respective forum) around. And, of course, feel free to post a thread and ask as many questions as you care to!

    HP

  10. #30
    Thanks for the vidieos! A great help!
    "Keep fighting for freedom and justice... but don't you forget to have fun doin' it. Let your laughter ring forth. Be outrageous, ridicule the fraidy-cat, rejoice in all the oddities that freedom can produce. And when you get through kickin' ass and celebratin' the sheer joy of a good fight, be sure to tell those who come after how much fun it was."

    Molly Irvin RIP

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