• Rev-It ST Pro Gloves

    I've been through about 6 pairs of gloves in a little over a year. I know, I have problems. But with hands being used so frequently in daily activities I think they merit excellent protection.
    I previously did a review on my Alpinestars SP2 gloves that I lowsided in. They held up just fine, but I heard numerous stories about them failing for other riders. That's no good.
    Being fed up with trying so many gloves I decided to drop some money and get a pair I could really trust. I went with the Rev-It ST Pros. At a retail price of $130 they're up there, and they're rare. I bought them without ever trying them on. However, I did order them directly from the company and they had great service



    The first thing that struck me was the knuckles. Carbon fiber is perfectly normal, but instead of being a smooth curve they have a jagged ridge. They look as if they're designed to punch things. What the actual purpose of this design is eludes me, but it looks pretty cool. There's also a small carbon fiber piece on the outside of the back of the hand for extra protection.
    Sidenote: some people argue carbon fiber does more harm than good. I argue the opposite, but it's your call.



    The palm is a bit unique. Like every respectable motorcycle glove it has two layers of leather. The difference is what it has in addition to the leather. There is some sort of honeycomb design made out of what feels like plastic. The honeycomb keeps it flexible, and I suppose the plastic is supposed to 1) slide better and/or 2) provide better abrasion resistance than leather alone. Furthermore, there is padding between the layers of leather, making the ride a lot easier on your palms.



    There are also additional grip aids (for lack of a better term). One on both the index and middle fingers, as well as around the connection points between the thumb and index finger. These are obviously there to provide extra grip on the levers and handlebars. While I don't know if they work, I do know that my hand has never slipped with these gloves on. Take that as you will.



    The back of all but the pinky finger also include pieces of fairly hard material that is probably meant as impact protection. Because of how solid the material is I don't know that it'll help, but I doubt that it hurts.



    The gloves also contain stretch panels on the back side of each finger, and one large one behind the carbon fiber knuckles to aid in comfort. The fingers are all pre-curved as well. For a snug fit, there's a double strap system with a band that tightens at the wrist and another on the end of the gauntlet. With both of these tightened it is impossible for me to pull the glove off.
    I sweat just about every time I wear these gloves, but I've been riding in 90+ degree weather for the past few months. I doubt these will work when temperatures drop below 40, but from 70-115 degrees, they've been suitable.

    On to the real reason I bought them: durability. I have used these approximately 5 times a week for the past 4 months, and I'm happy to report that there is not a single loose thread. The leather feels just as thick as the day I bought them, and I really can't find any flaws in the construction.
    But nothing is perfect, although my complaint(s) are minimal. Because of so much use, the black part of my right gauntlet has faded to more of a brown color. Also, the black leather on the palm rubs off onto the silver of the fingers, leaving them looking dirty. This has nothing to do with the integrity of the glove, but it's worth noting.

    For sizing comparison they fit extremely similar to Alpinestars gloves.

    I've come to learn that with motorcycle gear you typically get what you pay for. Although the price is steep on these gloves, they're no exception to the rule. If you care about quality gear you can depend on, these gloves just might be for you.
    This article was originally published in forum thread: Rev-It ST Pro Gloves started by DarkNinja75 View original post
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