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TurboDiesel5
03-11-2006, 10:00 PM
I was wondering if when you guys ride your bikes, do you double-shift like car drivers do (go from 3 to 2nd and add throttle before releasing the clutch) in order not to get a jolt and prevent forward lean? Thanks.... It didn't come up on the search...

Logan
03-11-2006, 10:50 PM
I was wondering if when you guys ride your bikes, do you double-shift like car drivers do (go from 3 to 2nd and add throttle before releasing the clutch) in order not to get a jolt and prevent forward lean? Thanks.... It didn't come up on the search...


Last time I drove a stick was in the mid 90s, but I never double clutched.

What you described isn't double-clutching.

From standardshift.com:

"Double-Clutching
Truck transmissions don't have synchromesh gears which allow you to shift even if the input and output shafts are rotating at a different speed. For a truck, you need to match speed with what the engine and wheels are doing. Shifting for truckers is a two-step process. Hit the clutch and put the transmission in neutral. You then quickly tap the accelerator to match engine revs with what the wheels are doing, hit the clutch and put it in gear. You can use this method to see how smoothly you are shifting normally, and helps you learn how to rev match. The benefits of rev matching include smoother transitions between gears, especially on downshifts as well as reducing the wear and tear on the synchromesh gears themselves. "


However, it's physically impossible to do this on a motorcycle. The shift gate is all straight line: 1-N-2-3-4-5-(6)

Some folks do blip the throttle to match up the engine & the trans, but it isn't necessary. A smooth release of the clutch along with a steady measured turn of the wrist, will avoid those jolts & leans. Sign up for an MSF or Ridersedge course & you'll learn all about it.

Galaxieman
03-11-2006, 11:19 PM
Clutches? We don't need no steenking clutches!

In all seriousness though, I do blip the throttle before releasing the clutch on downshifts. It's pretty much second nature now. It does still require smooth clutch release like Logan mentioned. A hard 3-2 downshift with a clutch dump on corner entry can have you looking like Nicky Hayden, and personally, I'd rather watch someone else back into a corner... at least while I'm riding on the street. Now if I can get to some trackdays this summer...

TurboDiesel5
03-12-2006, 07:44 AM
Oops.... mea culpa... I meant to say double clutching.. ha, but it came to me at almost 4 in the morning here so i was bound to screw something up... I realise what I described wasn't *the* double clutching method, just a simplified version of what I use on my car in order to make the shifts smoother without putting too much strain on the synchro's. I just figured if you get a jolt while driving a car, it might feel even worse for the inexperienced bike rider... thanks for clearing it up...

Zixxer10
03-14-2006, 08:52 AM
Oops.... mea culpa... I meant to say double clutching.. ha, but it came to me at almost 4 in the morning here so i was bound to screw something up... I realise what I described wasn't *the* double clutching method, just a simplified version of what I use on my car in order to make the shifts smoother without putting too much strain on the synchro's. I just figured if you get a jolt while driving a car, it might feel even worse for the inexperienced bike rider... thanks for clearing it up...
I posted this before but, to hit it again, modern manual transmissions all have constantly engaged gears. The modern gears have teeth that are cut on a curving angle. That allows more than one pair of teeth to be in contact with each other. The reason? It greatly reduces gear noise and spreads the load. Since the gears are curved, think rear end gears, they can't slide in and out of contact with each other. They're locked together in pairs. That means the gears on one shaft, the output shaft, have to be able to spin freely. Go to this link for an interactive guide on how a manual trans works.http://auto.howstuffworks.com/transmission5.htm

MsPotatoPotatoHead
03-15-2006, 12:26 PM
Blipping the throttle on downshifts does make for smoother shifting, but as a new rider, it's not something you should worry about just yet. You've got plenty to think about already! Once the rest of the stuff becomes second nature, then you can work on refining your skills and that will be the time to start blipping on downshifts (among other refinements). I didn't bother with this downshifting technique until I'd been riding a couple of years; now I do it as a matter of course.