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HotFix
01-25-2005, 12:49 PM
I hear communication is the key to a good relationship. Or at least I think I heard that.. I really wasn't paying attention.

My fiancee is looking into riding and She would feel better if she could chat with me.

My question is what is a good bike to bike communication system to fit inside some HJC helmets? What kind of money are we talking about here? Anyone use Chatterbox? I don't mind shelling out the $$$ to do it right. I really don't want to waste $ and then add $ to get something that half works.

Motorradneuling
01-25-2005, 01:26 PM
I have no direct exerience but I've been looking into them too. I keep reading good and bad about ChatterBox, depending on your expectations, and only good about Autocomm.

dalan
01-25-2005, 01:51 PM
I'm in the same boat - looking for B2B radios for my wife and I. Looking forward to input from folks with first-hand experience with various systems.

xcorider
01-25-2005, 02:28 PM
Is she riding her own or behind you? I started riding my own bike about a year ago. My husband bought J&M Hand Held CB's so we could communicate. They work great! Our headsets are also from J&M, # HS81340F. I like the CB better than Chatterboxes because we also ride with others and can communicate with them as well. With the chatterboxes you are limited to each other... which is okay too! Our friends started with those and switched to CB's. As for $$$... it'll cost you about $500 for each setup! But it is well worth it!

Mer
01-25-2005, 03:03 PM
We've been using the Chatterbox system for a few years now. They work pretty good once you have them "tweaked" and adjusted right. The Chatterbox system we had (FRSX2) used the FRS frequencies which work with other systems using the FRS systems. They had a pretty good range (suppose to be 2 miles) but they never did transmit as far as they were suppose to. Probably about 1/2-1 mile range. They come with rechargable batteries that lasted as long as we ever needed to ride. (we rode over 6 hours and never had a problem with the batteries running out.)

HotFix
01-25-2005, 03:28 PM
Is she riding her own or behind you?

Both. ;-)

dalan
01-25-2005, 04:06 PM
Both. ;-)


Heh. If I may make a suggestion - you might want to consider having her ride in front of you, or at least talk to her about it. That works best for my wife and I - she's more comfortable getting to set the pace, which is usually somewhat slower than I would ride if alone - and I don't have to worry about going too fast and/or losing her, and I actually get to look forward rather than constantly watching her in my mirrors. She also gets to pick when/where we stop, which is good because she invariably needs to stop more frequently than I do.

Cindy
01-25-2005, 04:32 PM
We originally bought Chatterboxes and had nothing but trouble with them. Here is Paul's review on epinions.com.

http://www.epinions.com/content_150608187012

We now have the Autocom system. To be honest though, we don't use them on short trips. I don't like to chat while riding, but they do come in handy for long trips when you need to communicate or just point out something of interest.

Cindy

HotFix
01-26-2005, 07:13 AM
Heh. If I may make a suggestion - you might want to consider having her ride in front of you, or at least talk to her about it. That works best for my wife and I - she's more comfortable getting to set the pace, which is usually somewhat slower than I would ride if alone - and I don't have to worry about going too fast and/or losing her, and I actually get to look forward rather than constantly watching her in my mirrors. She also gets to pick when/where we stop, which is good because she invariably needs to stop more frequently than I do.
That is a very good point dalan. Another method of thought would be she may feel more comfortable following me. That way she can watch what I do, not worry about hazards and speed so much, and not think I am watching her every move on her bike.

I say this because I ride with people with 10+ years experience and I enjoy following there lead and learn much on how to handle some situations.

HotFix
01-26-2005, 07:23 AM
duplicate post... how dow I delete?

dalan
01-26-2005, 09:12 AM
That is a very good point dalan. Another method of thought would be she may feel more comfortable following me. That way she can watch what I do, not worry about hazards and speed so much, and not think I am watching her every move on her bike.

Absolutely; everybody's different. I was actually somewhat suprised that my wife prefers to lead for the very reasons you mentioned. You'll just have to see what works out best for you two. If you end up leading, just be real careful that you're not unintentionally pushing her to ride harder/faster than she would otherwise.

Cindy
01-26-2005, 09:23 AM
When I first started riding, I preferred following. Now it depends on where we are going and how fast we are going to ride, he has the radar detector.

Cindy

NYRobG
01-26-2005, 02:33 PM
I have and happily use a Chatterbox FRS X2 and have some good things to say about it and some not so good things to say about it. Here we go...

The Good: Nice solid unit that can be exposed to the elements a bit and won't let you down. I don't keep it out in a hard-driving rain for long, and I always carry Zip-Lock bags in my saddlebags in case I get stuck and have to stow it. The battery is good for as long as my butt can ride in a day. Recharging time (10 hours) might be an issue on an Iron Butt run. The range of the FRS is as stated 1 - 2 miles depending on terrain. The audio amp is nice and the noise cancelling speaker/mic system works well.

The Bad: I don't like mounting the bulky unit to my helmet with 2-3 cables attached, and at speed it causes a slight whistle. I spend more time adjusting the VOX level than I think I should. It's a little tough to see the LED display while it's mounted to the side of your head.

The solutions: I bought a coiled extension cord and a RAM mount kit for it and have attached the base unit to the left side of my bars. I use the PTT switch attached to my left grip. This way I can see the display while setting it up and only have one wire (the extension cord) leading to my helmet, which now doesn't have that bulky whistling unit attached anymore.

None of the bike-to-bike communication devices that I've run across is all that well thought out, IMHO. I'd love to have the time and resources to build the better mouse trap. I can't imagine it would be all that difficult. This one certainly isn't, but it does get the job done.

--My $.02 worth.

--Rob